Conqueror Worm

Conqueror Worm

the worm ultimately vanquishes man in grave. [Am. Lit.: “Ligeia” in Tales of Terror]
See: Death
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
And, over each quivering form, The curtain, a funeral pall, Comes down with the rush of a storm, And the angels,all pallid and wan, Uprising, unveiling, affirm That the play is the tragedy, "Man," And its hero the Conqueror Worm.
Boyle: Lenoriana: "Annabel Lee," "Lenore," "To," "The Conqueror Worm," "Intermezzo," "El Dorado," "Lenore," "A Dream within a Dream," "To Helen." Laurie Altman: Two Songs from Mountain interval "A Time to Talk," "The Sound of Trees." Daron Aric Hagen: Larkin Songs: "1a.
Engel deciphers the affinities between Poe and Francis Quarles, the English romantic poet, whose surname Poe borrowed as a pseudonym to sign his first printed version of "The Raven." Engel provides several examples of analogies between the works of the two authors, including, for example, analysis of Quarles's "Feast for Wormes" and Poe's "The Conqueror Worm." In chapter two, John Edward Martin's "'A snare in every human path': 'Tamerlane' and the Paternal Scapegoat" deciphers the "significance of the power dynamics at work within [Tamerlane's] nominal confessional narrative" (14).
borealis, fires above the Conqueror Worm and beneath till the sun runs
Moreover, why represent American Gothic verse with only a few poems by Poe (excluding 'The Conqueror Worm', one of most Gothic poems) and Dickinson?
There is something for almost everyone in this volume--from the downright creepy "The Conqueror Worm" by Barbara D'Amato, where computers are the medium for the restless dead to contact the living, to a caper in which a teenage girl hones some unique abilities in order to save her family business.
The poems presented here are "The Raven", "Annabel Lee", "Lines on Ale", "The City in the Sea", "The Sleeper", "Eldorado", "Alone", "The Haunted Palace", and the "Conqueror Worm", each accompanied by gleefully ghoulish color illustrations.
The poem <IR> THE CONQUEROR WORM </IR> was written in 1843 and added to Ligeia in 1845.
He connects Glanvill's words with Ligeia when he speaks of her "intensity in thought, action, or speech" as "a result, or at least an index" of her "gigantic volition." After she fell ill, he was struck by "the fierceness of resistance with which she wrestled with the Shadow." He recalls that just before she died, she asked him to repeat a poem she had written some days before, a symbolic poem portraying life as a tragic drama with "its hero, the conqueror Worm," which finally devours each actor.
Classics like Rosemary's Baby (Polanski, 1968), Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960), and the Hammer Poe series directed by Corman (1960-1964) are addressed in depth, of course, but some lesser-known films also get the deluxe treatment here, including the undefinable Spider Baby or, The Maddest Story Ever Told (Jack Hill, 1964), John Moxey's Horror Hotel (U.K., 1960), and Michael Reeves's The Conqueror Worm (1968).