Conrad, Lord

Conrad, Lord

proud, ascetic but successful buccaneer. [Br. Lit.: The Corsair, Walsh Modern, 104]
See: Piracy
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conrad's Jim reads Shakespeare, and many critics have regarded Jim as tragic, though he reads Shakespeare to "cheer" himself up (Conrad, Lord Jim 222).
Implying that Jim's mind is controlled by his father's parochial and simplistic assumptions about good and evil, Conrad describes Patusan as "a remote district of a native-ruled state" (Conrad, Lord Jim 205).
In Patusan, Jim resides in the "valley" which is "nothing but a narrow ravine" where the "two halves [lean] slightly apart" (Conrad, Lord Jim 205).
I've been dreaming of it," Marlow says, "I perceived myself unexpectedly to be thoroughly sick of him" (Conrad, Lord Jim 219-20).
The Rajah's "weak mouth" (Conrad, Lord Jim 213) mirrors Jim's inarticulateness (215) which leads to outbursts like those in the explosive scene in the billiards hall which reveal Jim's latent rage (184-85).
He assured me more than once that he had never found himself the worse for her advice" (Conrad, Lord Jim 272).
(18) Marlow says that "Jim did not know the almost inconceivable egotism of the man which made him, when resisted and foiled in his will, mad with the indignant and revengeful rage of a thwarted autocrat" (Conrad, Lord Jim 370).
The power of sound has always been greater than the power of sense.a Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim, 1900