consistory

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consistory

A chamber used for a church court.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the Consistory Court ruling has made that impossible and Mrs Hildreth said: "The crux of the matter is, I have to lay her to rest in a place she hated.
The Consistory Court will con vene on May 31 at St Hildeburgh's when High Court judge and Chancellor of the Diocese of Chester, David Turner QC, will hear the arguments and make the ruling.
A rare Consistory Court of the Church of England will be convened at St Hildeburgh's Church in Hoylake,Wirral, to decide whether families should remove additions they have made to graves.
The judge said Consistory Courts must be 'seen to act firmlyand fairly in the event of blatant breaches of this sort' but granted a temporary Confirmatory Faculty, albeit with strict conditions which require the parish to deliver proposals for a comprehensive reordering of the church within five years.
Church of England buildings that have been consecrated are subject to complicated planning processes and permission must be granted for any changes by the consistory court.
Charles Mynors, a consistory court judge and chancellor of the Diocese of Worcester, said there was nothing to link the skull with the age old story it was stolen hundreds of years ago for a PS300 wager.
However Euan Duff, chancellor of the Diocese of Newcastle, and a judge of the Church of England's consistory court, which has to approve issues relating to church matters, refused permission for the sale.
And now, notoriously, the Consistory Court of the Diocese of London has given the parish permission to sell the large painting of Devout Men Taking the Body of St Stephen (1776), which the artist, Benjamin West, intended as an altarpiece.
St Mary's Church, in Grassendale, had to go to the Church of England's Consistory Court after two members of the congregation objected to the plan.
Philip, a father of two from Lynesack, near Bishop Auckland, said: "The kind of matters I dealt with ranged from planning applications to alter church buildings to the consistory court of the Diocese, to advising Bishops, Archdeacons, senior clergy and other officers, the appointments of vicars to parishes and finding a way through family disputes over exhumations.
Judge Paul Downes, chancellor of the Diocese of Wakefield and a judge of the Church of England's Consistory Court, refused permission to move both tombs following her appeal.
However, the Church of England''s Consistory Court heard Abbey secured permission for a black granite wedge, without telling the church it would be an open book design.