Lascaris, Constantine

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Lascaris, Constantine

(kŏn`stəntēn lăs`kərĭs), d. 1501?, Greek grammarian. After the fall of Constantinople, Lascaris went to Italy and in Milan obtained the patronage of Francesco Sforza. His Greek grammar (1476) was the first book printed in Greek characters. He earned fame as a teacher of Greek and a leading proponent of the new learning of the Renaissance in Italy. His brother, Andreas Joannes Lascaris or Janus Lascaris, c.1445–1535, taught Greek in Florence, Paris, and Rome.
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Pliny the Elder is given a work of Pliny the Younger, two different dates are given for the Aldine Plato, both wrong, Manuel Chrysoloras (often misspelt) and Constantine Lascaris, who each wrote Erotemata, are persistently confused.
From a general point of view, the most important study to be found in the volume is probably the twelfth article "L'insegnamento universitario e la cultura bizantina in Italia del Quattrocento." In a famous letter Constantine Lascaris, one of the great Greek teachers of the second half of the fifteenth century, is complaining about the miserable living conditions of the Byzantine teachers in Italy.
The major outlines of Aldus's life and career emerge clearly: first the move to Venice, the entrance into the circle of Venetian erudition surrounding Ermolao Barbaro, and the preparations to yoke that erudition to the new art of printing; then the commissioning of Francesco Griffo to carve a new Greek fount, the first efforts to use that fount in Constantine Lascaris's Erotemata, and the solid success attained by the monumental edition of Aristode; and finally the change in direction that financed the continued printing of Greek with the publication of Latin and Italian authors in smaller, more affordable octavo editions.
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