Constantine XI


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Constantine XI

(Constantine Palaeologus), d. 1453, last Byzantine emperor (1449–53), brother and successor of John VIIIJohn VIII
(John Palaeologus), 1390–1448, Byzantine emperor (1425–48), son and successor of Manuel II. When he acceded, the Byzantine Empire had been reduced by the Turks to the city of Constantinople.
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. To secure Western aid against the Turkish assault on what remained of the empire, he proclaimed (1452) the union of the Western and Eastern Churches. No help came, however, and in 1453 Constantine, with some 8,000 Greeks, Venetians, and Genoese, faced 150,000 Turkish besiegers under Sultan Muhammad IIMuhammad II
or Mehmet II
(Muhammad the Conqueror), 1429–81, Ottoman sultan (1451–81), son and successor of Murad II. He is considered the true founder of the Ottoman Empire (Turkey).
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. After almost two months of heroic defense, directed by the emperor, the city and the empire fell. Constantine died fighting with the last of his men.

Constantine XI

1404--53, last Byzantine emperor (1448--53): killed when Constantinople was captured by the Turks
References in periodicals archive ?
Music to be performed includes Byzantine chants, Latin ceremonial motets and two haunting laments commemorating the fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks in 1453: Guillaume DuFay's "Ecclesiae Militantis" and a piece by Manuel Chrysaphes, court musician to the last Byzantine emperor, Constantine XI.
In 1453 they did, killing Constantine XI, the last emperor, and raping, murdering or enslaving many of the city's inhabitants.
The Ottoman sultan Mehmet II, born in 1432, was made sole heir at the age of eleven by the death of his two elder brothers; Constantine XI, born in 1404, was the fourth of six sons of Manuel II, whose imperial authority was inherited by the eldest John VIII.
Constantine XI put him in charge of the weakest part of the land walls, the section by the Gate of Romanos, and, as Nestor-Iskander says:
Appreciating this vital combination, in 1451 Constantine XI employed a Christian engineer, a Hungarian named Urban, to assist with the first, while he sent numerous appeals to the West for extra soldiers.
After the land battle Constantine XI ordered the clergy and monks to gather up the dead and bury them: a total of 1,740 Greeks and 700 Franks (i.
Constantinople had a new emperor, too, Constantine XI Palaeologus (1404-1453), who had come to the throne in 1449.
Constantine XI bravely set up a determined resistance.
Constantine XI was the last of the Byzantine emperors.

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