Constantius I

Constantius I

(Constantius Chlorus) (kənstăn`shəs), c.250–306, Roman emperor (305–6). A career general, he gave up HelenaHelena, Saint
, c.248–328?, mother of Constantine I. She became a Christian in 313. According to tradition she found (327) the relic of the True Cross in Jerusalem and identified the location of the Holy Sepulcher. Feast: Aug. 18.
..... Click the link for more information.
 to marry Theodora, the daughter of MaximianMaximian
(Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus) , d. 310, Roman emperor, with Diocletian (286–305). An able commander, he was made caesar (subemperor) by Diocletian in 285 and augustus in 286.
..... Click the link for more information.
. He was made caesar (subemperor) under Maximian in 293 and gained prestige when his forces defeated the rebel CarausiusCarausius
, d. 293, Gallo-Roman military commander. He was stationed in Gaul, but Emperor Maximian suspected him of conspiring with the Germans and condemned him to death. Carausius fled to Britain and established his rule there, defying attempts to conquer him.
..... Click the link for more information.
. He went to Britain in 296, where he put down a rebellion of Carausius' successor, Allectus. Returning to Gaul, he defeated the Alemanni in 298. His vigor and his moderation made him popular with the people of the colonies as well as with his soldiers. The two emperors, DiocletianDiocletian
(Caius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus) , 245–313, Roman emperor (284–305), b. near Salona, Dalmatia (the modern Split, Croatia). Of humble birth, he obtained high military command under Probus and Aurelian and fought under Carus in Persia.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and Maximian, abdicated in 305, and Constantius and GaleriusGalerius
(Caius Galerius Valerius Maximinianus) , d. 310, Roman emperor (305–10). Diocletian appointed him caesar for the eastern part of the empire in 293 (Constantius I was caesar of the West). He had to conduct hard campaigns in Pannonia and Asia.
..... Click the link for more information.
 became emperors. The next year, however, Constantius died at York. On his death the imperial throne was claimed by his son Constantine (Constantine IConstantine I
or Constantine the Great
, 288?–337, Roman emperor, b. Naissus (present-day Niš, Serbia). He was the son of Constantius I and Helena and was named in full Flavius Valerius Constantinus.
..... Click the link for more information.
), but the office was long contested.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
References in periodicals archive ?
Exhibits will include a limewood panel from 200-300AD, a marble sculpture of a barbarian captive, about 160-170AD and below, a gold medallion of Constantius I.
IMPRESSIVE: A gold medallion of Constantius I and a marble sculpture of a barbarian captive will be on display at the Herbert.
A gold medallion of Constantius I; (right) a marble sculpture of a barbarian captive; a limewood panel portrait of a woman; and (below) a marble head from the statue of the Emperor Commodus from the exhibition.
Allectus also turned usurper but was defeated by Constantius I, father of the Emperor Constantine, in 296.
Born at Naissus (Nis), the eldest son of Constantius I, on February 17 (c.
Constantius I was one of four emperors who together made up the so-called tetrarchy (literally, in Greek, 'the rule of four') which controlled the empire under the leadership of the senior emperor, Diocletian.
Constantius I was in charge of Spain, Gaul (roughly modern France and the Low Countries) and Britain.
He proclaims he will praise only one good deed of Constantius I, that of having insisted on leaving wealth in the hands of owners.
It also evokes the theme of dreams; Constantius is attempting to fulfill his, and his mother simply squashes them with no attempt to be sympathetic.
Eusebius's response to Patrophilus's alliance with Constantius is to undermine the legitimacy of the bishop and emperor alike.
The fact that the confrontation of Leontius and Constantius is mentioned after the account of the controversy with Eusebia suggests that it occurred sometime later, i.e., after 358.
Libanius' famous invective against the courtiers of Constantine and Constantius is in Or.