Constructive Logic

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Constructive Logic

 

a logic developed in conformity with the principles of the constructive school, distinguished by constructiveness (possibility of effective construction) of objects whose existence is affirmed in statements (propositions).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, today, Armenia remains far away from constructive logic in this regard.
The second contribution is a constructive logic embedded in the concept of critical juncture.
Our setting is Bishop's constructive mathematics ([3], [4], [5], [6], [8] and [15]), mathematics developed with Constructive logic (or Intuitionistic logic) - logic without the Law of Excluded Middle P [disjunction][logical not]P.
A recent articulation of this view has been developed in terms of quantification over different cases: classical logic emerges from consistent and complete cases, constructive logic from consistent and incomplete cases, and paraconsistent logic from inconsistent and complete cases.
Constructive logic accepts the truth of every integer is either even or odd, but only because we have an effective means of determining which alternative holds for any integer.
In any case, what happens to alternative solutions, such as in some kind of constructive logic where the duality of [sections]2.3 between indirect proof and reductio is rejected?
Schematically, the situation can be depicted as follows, where [L.sub.Co] stands for 'core logic' = constructive logic, [A.sup.(+)] is the hypothesis of a theorem, and [C.sup.(-)] is the conclusion:
Dan Sahlin's research interests include design and implementation of logic programming languages, and he is currently focusing on extensions of Prolog based on constructive logic. Sahlin is a member of the Logic Programming Systems Laboratory at the Swedish Institute of Computer Science in Stockholm, Sweden.
Constructive Logic, Truth and Warranted Assertability, G.
It excludes, for example, systems of constructive logic in which proofs are interpreted as programs, and it excludes uses of logic in which computation is construed model-theoretically as evaluating a formula in an interpretation.
While developing in greater detail his own version of antirealism that respects those two constraints, Tennant combines the knowability requirement with the claim that truth need not be bivalent, which in turn leads him to replace classical logic based on bivalence by a nonclassical constructive logic, namely, intuitionistic relevant logic.

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