Contamination


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Related to Contamination: Cross contamination

contamination

[kən‚tam·ə′nā·shən]
(computer science)
Placement of data at incorrect locations in storage, where it generally overlays valid information or a program code and produces bizarre results.
(geology)
A process in which the chemical composition of a magma changes due to the assimilation of country rocks.
(hydrology)
The addition to water of any substance or property that prevents its use without further treatment.
(microbiology)
The process or act of soiling with bacteria.
(nucleonics)
The deposit of radioactive materials, such as fission fragments or radiological warfare agents, on any objective or surface or in the atmosphere.
(psychology)
The fusion of words, resulting in a new word.
(science and technology)
Something that contaminates.

Contamination

Introduction into water, air, and soil of micro-organisms, chemicals, toxic substances, wastes, or wastewater in a concentration that makes the medium unfit for its next intended use. Also applies to surfaces of objects, buildings, and various household and agricultural use products.

Contamination

 

the process of alteration of rocks of sedimentary, metamorphic, and magmatic origin by magma.

Owing to the interaction of magma with enclosing rock, there occurs a partial dissolution of the latter and formation of hybrid rock having a different petrologic composition as compared to the original magma. The term “contamination” was originally proposed by the English scientist H. Read (1923). He viewed the process as one of contamination of magma with sedimentary and metamorphic rock. Contamination is most clearly seen during the interaction of magma with rocks of contrasting composition (for example, granitic magma with limestone or ultrabasic rock). Contamination takes place at various depths in the earth’s crust. Unlike the process of assimilation, during contamination, inclusions of foreign material preserve relics of the structure of the original rock. Sometimes the boundaries of inclusions are also preserved, making it possible to draw conclusions about their original form.

REFERENCE

Afanas’ev, G. D. Geologiia magmaticheskikh kompleksov Severnogo Kavkaza i osnovnye cherty sviazannoi s nimi mineralizatsii. Moscow, 1958.

M. G. RUB


Contamination

 

(1) In textual criticism, the blending of the texts of different versions of a single work; a text-critical device used when sources do not yield a satisfactory redaction corresponding to the author’s intent, for example, some works of Old Russian literature. The text of Lermontov’s narrative poem The Demon (Sobr. soch. M. lu. Lermontova, vols. 1–6, published by the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, 1954–57) is also an example of contamination.

(2) In linguistics, the formation of a new word or set phrase by the blending of two different words or expressions that are similar in sound, structure, or meaning. For example, the modern Russian word svidetel’, meaning “eyewitness,” arose through a combination of the Old Russian word s”vedetel’ meaning “he who knows,” and the verb videti, “to see.” Many incorrect word usages are the result of contamination, for example, igrat znachenie, “to play significance,” from igrat’ rol’ “to play a role,” and imet’znachenie, “to be significant.” Such contaminations are often widely used and even enter the literary language.


Contamination

 

in mineral extraction, the process during which mineral resources are made impure by unprofitable mineral grades and country rock. This leads to a decrease in the profitable content of the extracted raw material, an increase in expenditures on the extraction and transportation of the mineral resource, and a decrease of the technical and economic work rates of concentration plants. The level of contamination depends on the conditions of the mineral resource deposits, the equipment used, the mining systems, and the organization of mining. Contamination reaches ten percent when ore deposits are worked under favorable rock and geological conditions; it may reach 35–40 percent when the bedding is complex.

What does it mean when you dream about contamination?

The meaning of a dream of contamination often depends on the occupation of the dreamer. A sanitary engineer might be fed up with the garbage he deals with on a daily basis. Another dreamer might be experiencing an internal contamination from conflicts in the person’s value system (e.g., the dreamer might be stealing supplies from the workplace while at the same time receiving bonuses for being an exceptional employee).

contamination

The introduction of sewage, wastes, and/or chemicals (or other material) into a potable water supply that render it unfit for its intended purpose.
References in periodicals archive ?
During collection, the burs were handled using sterile technique to prevent any contamination. After collection, all the burs were randomly allocated to positive control, negative control and test groups.
At Texhong, the application of Total Contamination Control made an impressive impact.
PCBA contamination can be detected throughout electronics manufacturing, including the assembly process, test and long-term testing stages, and finished goods.
More than one-third of the total contamination cases were still under investigation last year, and regulators had planned or implemented "corrective action" in nearly 900 others.
Polishing materials for example, brushes, wheels, pumice, polishing buff and burs used in finishing of dental prosthesis prepared in dental laboratories can transmit different infectious agents and are possible sources of cross contamination for dental laboratory technicians, dentists and for patients.2
The optical technologies used today are limited to inspect contamination which is on the pellets.
So I have taken a study in the tertiary care hospital to known the incidence of urine culture contamination so that suitable action can be taken to reduce the incidence of contamination in the urine cultures.
Q: What biofilms and other forms of adhered contamination are detached, captured, and removed by the product?
Categorical variables such as type of micro-organism and degree of contamination are presented as frequencies and/or percentages.
Following an introduction and a guide to resources for contamination control, chapters discuss issues of chemical contamination (including raw materials, medicinal gases and volatile anesthetics, diagnostic imaging agents, containers, closures, delivery systems and filters, and medical devices); physical contamination with particulate matter; microbiological and endotoxin contamination; contamination from sterilization procedures; and biotechnological products.
However, because of the ubiquitous presence in the environment of some of these chemicals, such as bisphenol A (BPA), external contamination during handling and analysis of the biospecimens collected for biomonitoring evaluations could compromise the reported concentrations of such chemicals.

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