A Cappella

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A Cappella

 

polyphonic singing, primarily choral, without instrumental accompaniment. It is widely used in folk music.

A cappella choir singing took definite shape in religious polyphony during the late Middle Ages, flowered in the work of the Renaissance composers of the Netherlands, and received its classical expression in the Roman school—for example, in the work of the Italian composer G. Palestrina. All choir music in the Orthodox Church is sung a cappella—for instance, the works of the composer D. S. Bortnianskii. Beginning with the Renaissance, a cappella singing developed in secular choral music as well as in church music, particularly in such genres as the madrigal in vocal chamber music. Many contemporary choral works are written a cappella—for instance, ten revolutionary poems arranged for choir by D. D. Shostakovich.

REFERENCE

Handschin, J. Die Grundlagen des a-cappella-Stils. Zurich, 1929.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their mission is to promote and cultivate contemporary a cappella music in the Philippines through performance opportunities, recognition and education; to foster local artists that they be recognized around the world; and to enrich Original Pilipino Music through vocal music.
With an ever-expanding fan base, Rockapella's members are known as the Kings of Contemporary A Cappella.
Sharon, the self-proclaimed father of contemporary a cappella and a member of the House Jacks, replaced four-part harmony with parts that individuals could sing in lieu of instruments.
Traditional choral a cappella usually brings together a group of 16 people or more, while contemporary a cappella utilizes three to nine singers.
Founded in 2001, the student-directed singing group won Best Female Collegiate Album last year for its CD ``Undivided'' at the Contemporary A Cappella Recording Awards.
Songs from the group's new CD, `Undivided,' have been nominated in every category for the Contemporary A Cappella Society's 2006 CARA awards.
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