Contredanse


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Contredanse

 

an English folk dance that developed in the 17th and 18th centuries. It later became popular in other European countries as a ball dance and was replaced in the 19th century by the quadrille.

The contredanse originally had one figure and then five or six; it is written in 2/4 or 6/8 time. John Playford was the first to write arrangements of the contredanse in the dance collection English Dancing Master (1651). As a musical form, the contredanse was used by such composers as Mozart, Beethoven, and Tchaikovsky.

References in periodicals archive ?
(69.) La combinacion de elementos ingleses y franceses en la Contredanse temprana se discute en Guilcher, J.
The figures may, in fact, be traced back to the predecessor of the quadrille, the eighteenth-century contredanse francaise or cotillion.
(2.) The name "country-dance" does not have rustic: associations, but is a translation of the French "Contredanse," so named because men and women lined up across from one another (Wood 92; "Country Dance" 235).
In my own teaching, even students who are well aware of current thinking about performance practices are usually at a loss when asked to define the character of a given movement or theme even though Haydn does write themes in a variety of styles (march, contredanse, sarabande etc.), which in performance need to be markedly delineated.
A second essay in this section, by co-editor Catherine Mayes, outlines the decline and transformation of the Contredanse Hongroise in the early nineteenth century, from an actual dance to an 'exotic' musical showpiece, before its popularity was eventually overtaken by the waltz.
For example, in using dance notation and dance treatises to recreate the choreography of the bourree, contredanse, Deutscher-Walzer, and landler, Lawrence Zbikowski and Eric McKee rightly emphasize the importance of dance-music relations and "embodied meanings." Likewise, quoting the poet Schubart, Andrew Haringer reconstructs the "mystical aura" of the horn and hunt, and uses other writings to identify the several subtypes of military and pastoral styles (his chapter supplements Monelle's The Musical Topic: Hunt, Military and Pastoral [Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006]).
She then focuses more directly on the Caribbean and Atlantic diaspora, beginning with a discussion of dances that are related to European contredanse, though some, particularly the bele lino of Martinique, seem so African in their expression that others may suspect that their basic DNA is African, with some morphology shared with contredanse.
The 330,000gns purchase SEVENVEILS (4.30)hasn't liveduptoexpectationsyet, but as a sister to Italian Oaks winner Contredanse, Sir Mark Prescott's filly is bredtobesmartandshegot off the mark in impressive styleat YarmouthinJuly.
The Luca Cumani-trained Contredanse heads a fourstrong British challenge for the Grade 1 EP Taylor Stakes, while Baltazaar's Gift and Serious Attitude take on the locals in the Grade 1 Nearctic Stakes.
She has been placed in French fillies' Classics on her last two starts, however, and makes more appeal than the other three-year-old in the field, Contredanse. Admittedly, Contredanse has made significant strides since joining Luca Cumani this year, winning a couple of handicaps before completing her hat-trick with a narrow success in a Group Two in Italy.
The daughter of Fantastic Light contested some good races in Italy and France this season and ran a cracker when just held by Cumani's Contredanse in the Italian Oaks.
The danzon, which is traced to the introduction of the French contredanse in Haiti around the 18th century, used a timpani (often called "Creole Timpani") to accompany the native contradanzas played by an "orquesta tipica." Due to the migration of French colonialists and their Haitian slaves into the eastern Cuban province of Oriente, the contradanza found a new home in the largest of the Greater Antilles.