convection cell

(redirected from Convection cells)

convection cell

[kən′vek·shən ‚sel]
(geophysics)
A concept in plate tectonics that accounts for the lateral or the upward and downward movement of subcrustal mantle material as due to heat variation in the earth.
(meteorology)
An atmospheric unit in which organized convective fluid motion occurs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The upwelling in the convection cells occurs under the Earth's divergent plate boundaries, and cooler material sinks at the convergent boundaries.
The atmosphere will be unstable and surface warming combined with wind circulation at night to stimulate strong convection cells. Residents are advised to be vigilant for lighting strikes, strong winds, sudden downpours, and flash floods.
In the upper unit, which is in direct communication with the ocean, advection of heat is the dominant heat transport mechanism, with thermal convection cells developing adjacent to the crest of the diapir (Figure 9).
With its large aperture, the telescope was probably looking through a column of air that contained numerous image-distorting convection cells, each an estimated 10 to 20 cm across.
The sun is covered with granular convection cells similar to a pot of water at a rolling boil.
"The 'X' feature is likely one of these - a former quadruple junction where four convection cells meet," NASA said.
(4) Analyzing the flow structure, we found these humps to be a result of short-range convection cells. The local dependency has been assumed to be a result of the superposition of the flow causing the wave front and short-range fluctuations.
In 1968, scientists theorized that even longer-lived and larger convection cells, big enough to span the entire convective zone, maintain the fast rotation researchers had long observed around the sun's equator; without such cells, the poles should rotate faster than the equator.
In nature, the convection cells formed from air rising above sunlight-warmed land or water are a major feature of all weather systems.
But at this moment there are just some convection cells formed near the top wall and the interaction between the cold and hot oil is just confined to some small regions, which can be seen in Figure 8.
On very small scales this is basic molecular convection, but as we get into scales of tens and hundreds of feet, these convection cells aggregate into thermals.
The entire surface is riddled with granulation: small convection cells of hot gas rising from below, breaking up, and sinking back down on a timescale of just a few minutes.