cooling degree day


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cooling degree day

[′kül·iŋ di′grē ‚dā]
(mechanical engineering)
A unit for estimating the energy needed for cooling a building; one unit is given for each degree Fahrenheit that the daily mean temperature exceeds 75°F (24°C).
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Reference temperature is essential in determining heating and cooling degree days. The difference (in degrees) between inside temperatures and outside weather temperatures when it drops below a specified reference temperature is referred to as the heating degree day (Fung et al, 2015).
3); MEDFAMINCj is the median family income in state j in 2014 (US Census Bureau 2015); POPDENj is the population density expressed in terms of residents per square mile in state j in 2013 (Council for Community and Economic Research 2016); and CDDj is the average annual number of cooling degree days in state j (US Census Bureau 2012, table 496).
On the other hand, 2015 did have 7.4% more heating degree days and 1.7% more cooling degree days when compared to 2013, attributing 45,433 kWh of total savings to the difference in roof insulation after the upgrade and accounting for weather conditions.
Electricity consumption was regressed on temperature, in raw form as well as by first calculating the heating degree days (HDDs) and cooling degree days (CDDs).
Download heating or cooling degree days as needed in the same measurement periods you're using in the first column--monthly, weekly, or daily--and insert these into the middle column.
The Annual issue contains monthly and annual averages of temperature, precipitation, temperature extremes, freeze data, soil temperatures, evaporation, and a recap of monthly cooling degree days.
The gas market "continues to be under pressure'' as demand-weighted cooling degree days, a measure of weather-related electricity demand, have been below normal, Soozhana Choi, a strategist at Deutsche Bank AG in Washington, said in a note to clients Monday.
coal demand rose sharply in the third quarter with a significant increase in cooling degree days, which helped to draw down stockpiles in the Ohio Valley.
ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE 2004a) provides a classification of climate zones according to the heating and cooling degree days and the atmospheric moisture.
The standard "weather playbook" is usually associated with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, where a market exists for derivatives based on cooling degree days and heating degree days.
The derivatives are based on heating degree days and cooling degree days and cover 35 cities worldwide, of which 18 are in the United States, nine in Europe, six in Canada, and two in Japan.
Futures, options, and swaps exist on heating and cooling degree days. Additionally, several private firms have created individual contracts concerning moisture and frost dates that help manage the risk of weather.