Cooper pairs


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Cooper pairs

[′kü·pər ‚perz]
(solid-state physics)
Pairs of bound electrons which occur in a superconducting medium according to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, suppose the Cooper pair charge velocity is constant at the two adjacent points; then the last integral quantity measures the difference in the interaction energy [delta][W.sub.int] between the Cooper pairs and the vector potential at the two points:
These eigenmodes represent collective oscillations of the direction of total angular momenta of Cooper pairs which generate fluctuations of axial currents in the superfluid system (spin density fluctuations).
Previously, the cooper pair effect was not associated with photons.
Cooper pairs spatially confined to a single superconducting island in a JJA exhibit local coherence of the wave function phase.
Because the dynamics of Cooper pairs in doped carbon nanotubes can be more close to the diffusive regime, the Usadel equations can be applied to calculate the finite conductivity at T [much less than] [T.sub.c] [19].
Researchers working in physics, from the US, Europe, Brazil, Mexico, and Japan discuss Cooper pairs, superconductivity in highly correlated systems, the behavior of the Bose Einstein condensation critical temperature, the plasmon exchange model in carbon nanotubes, thermodynamic properties of point node superconductors, theory of the thermopower in YBCO, high-temperature superconductivity in carbon nanotubes, and magnetism and quark matter.
In addition, Perez-Enriquez [7], while working on high-Tc superconductivity, found that by using a Mobius-type orbital for Cooper pairs, there is a structural parameter in perovskite type superconductors that correlates linearly with the critical temperature.
The superconducting analogs of these devices, in which electrons are bound in "Cooper pairs" of charge 2 e, are attractive for two reasons.
I had wondered for years whatever became of Ogg's oggons - and only much later found out that they had become Cooper pairs as an adjunct of the BCS theory of superconductivity, these being pairs of bound electrons that occur in a superconducting medium.
The quantum state of the first qubit, which is defined by the number of superconducting electron pairs (also known as Cooper pairs) contained in it, was first transferred to a microwave photon of a resonator using very precisely controlled microwave pulses.
Unlike Cooper pairs, these coupled electrons did not coordinate their movements, Levy says.