Cooperative Information System

Cooperative Information System

(networking)
(CIS) Networked computers which support individual or collaborative human work, and manage access to information and computing services. Computation is done concurrently over the network by cooperative database systems, expert systems, multi-agent planning systems, and other software application systems ranging from the conventional to the advanced.
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Two years later the Voluntary Cooperative Information System (VCIS) came into existence in order to further encourage uniform data collection.
This cooperative information system rewards employees based on overall company performance.
"An Evaluation of the JAVA-based Approaches to Web Database Access." International Journal of Cooperative Information Systems. 10 (4), 401-423.
In Proceedings of the First IFCIS International Conference on Cooperative Information Systems (Coop-IS'96), 21-23 June, Brussels, Belgium.
The recent emphasis on enhanced traceability is part of a larger vision of cooperative information systems emerging from trends in industrial practice as well as academic research.
Generalizing the software process architecture discussed here, cooperative information systems are defined as continuously aligning three very different, but interdependent facets: human work practice of the users, organizational concepts and models, and open information systems technologies.
Addressing data quality problems is particularly important in contexts characterized by extensive data replication, such as in Cooperative Information Systems (CISs).
The DaQuinCIS project 1 proposes an architecture based on peer-to-peer services for quality improvement and maintenance in Cooperative Information Systems. In this architecture heterogeneous and geographically distributed organizations may exchange data and related quality data using a common semi-structured data model based on XML.
The second contribution is an overall approach to data quality improvement in cooperative information systems, in which a periodical record matching activity is complemented by a quality improvement performed at query processing time.
A third way to understand our three-faceted view is to regard it as a foundation for defining cooperative information systems [6].
For example, the CSCW community focuses on work practice and systems, the Cooperative Information Systems community primarily addresses systems issues, while researchers in the IS arena (represented by conferences such as ICIS and CAiSE) deal largely with organizational issues without considering the technical options in depth.

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