Copernican principle


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Copernican principle

[kə′pər·nə·kən ¦prin·sə·pəl]
(astronomy)
The idea that the earth occupies a typical or unexceptional position in the universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
So let us ask: what if the Copernican Principle is wrong?
In cosmology, the "Axis" is dubbed "Evil" because, if it does exist, it completely nullifies the cherished Copernican Principle upon which modern cosmology presently is based, and ultimately destroys the foundation of modernity itself.
The Copernican principle is an irreducible philosophical assumption, one whose implications go well beyond cosmology.
Dennis Danielson, who has pointed out that the Copernican principle does not carry the misanthropic interpretation that many modern scientists ascribe to it, has started some reassessment of this work.
Although the Copernican principle may be widely accepted by fiat, it is imperative that such a foundational principle be proven," Caldwell and Stebbins assert in the May 16 Physical Review Letters.
In the same issue of Physical Review Letters, Jean-Philippe Uzan of Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris, along with Chris Clarkson and George Ellis of the University of Cape Town in South Africa, suggest a different way to test the Copernican principle.
Finally, the Copernican principle states, in Livio's words, that "we do not occupy a privileged place in the universe.
With the coming of Copernican principles (see 1543), Earth itself became a sixth, coming between Venus and Mars.