Coping


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coping

[′kōp·iŋ]
(building construction)
A covering course on a wall.
(mechanical engineering)
Shaping stone or other nonmetallic substance with a grinding wheel.
(mining engineering)
Process of cutting and trimming the edges of stone slabs.
Process of cutting a stone slab into two pieces.

Coping

A protective covering over the top course of a wall or parapet, either flat or sloping on the upper surface to throw off water. If it extends beyond the wall, it may be cut with a drip to protect the wall surface below.

raking coping

A coping set on an inclined surface, as at a gable end.

coping

coping of terra-cotta
A protective cap, top, or cover of wall, parapet, pilaster, or chimney; often of stone, terra-cotta, concrete, metal, or wood. May be flat, but commonly sloping, double-beveled, or curved to shed water so as to protect masonry below from penetration of water from above. Most effective if extended beyond wall face and cut with a drip. Also see featheredged coping.
References in periodicals archive ?
We then tested a mediated model (Model 1), which contained the mediator (positive coping style) and a direct path from self-esteem to loneliness.
0 to test the mediating effects of positive coping in the relationship between self-esteem and loneliness.
These include strengthening of self-care skills, optimization of coping skills, minimizing the discomfort associated with change, and utilization of support from other stakeholders.
Coping skills training (CST) seeks to improve coping skills, while various methods of minimizing the discomfort of change (MDC) are used to minimize, postpone or redistribute the burden of living with diabetes.
A recent systematic review coping during pregnancy recommended that it is better to use of pregnancy-specific and daily process.
As we intended to build a coping questionnaire that considered typical stressful situations, we decided to utilize the latter classification, which corresponds to the types of problems that are more cited in the literature as stressful.
2005) reported that coping strategies play an important role in one's ability to adapt to stressful life conditions such as schizophrenia.
There are four major dimensions of coping strategies (Endler and Parker, 2000) which include problem focused, emotion focused (Folkman and Lazarus, 1984), religious focused (Pargament, 1997) and avoidance focused.
Though, in real life receiving a diagnosis of and living with any life threatening illness is devastating but the associated emotional, social and financial consequences of HIV/AIDS tend to make coping with this disease more difficult eventually intensifying the vulnerability to psychological problems.
Coping interventions would teach individuals about the range of coping strategies available for managing a variety of stressful stimuli and, in the context of tinnitus, how to strategically cope with the fluctuating symptoms of tinnitus.
With regards to religious coping, positive patterns of religious coping were used more frequently than the negative patterns by women with infertility problems.
Provide a therapeutic space for family members to think together about how they want to cope and what coping well means to their family.