copperplate engraving


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

copperplate engraving

[′käp·ər‚plāt in′grāv·iŋ]
(graphic arts)
A thin, rigid plate of copper, with the lines of a picture cut, or engraved, into it, used for printing purposes; it is inked over, the ink is removed so that it is retained only in the engraved lines, and the plate is placed in a handpress where ink is transferred from engraved lines to overlying paper.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
While other girls roughened their fingers embroidering linens for their trousseaux, Diana turned engraving needles to the preparation of several impressive copperplate engravings to bring to Rome with her.
Copperplate engraving (double-folio), Hortus Malabaricus, Vol.
The British Library also has a seventeenth century folio with two copperplate engravings displaying scenes from The Isle of Pines with German descriptions.
From about the end of the 1500s through the late 1770s, copperplate engravings illustrated books.
Prince Stanislas Klossowski de Rola (whose father is the painter Balthus) tells us during the 17th century "an unprecedented quantity of alchemical works were printed, a significant number of which contained copperplate engravings."
He wanted to show the book now to the man But as he turned the pages the words slid Into tiny portraits, copperplate engravings Of the servant girl, the duke, his mother, himself.
Room twenty-seven of the museum includes some of Plantin's own detailed anatomical drawings and wood and copperplate engravings. Elsewhere there is the first dictionary of the Dutch language -- compiled at Plantin's own initiative.
When in his essay "A Photograph" Ekelof mentions the four French copperplate engravings of the Achilles legend which hung over the living-room sofa in his childhood home and singles out one where Achilles is dressed as a girl in an attempt to escape going to the Trojan War, Lagercrantz takes this as yet another "proof' of Ekelof's fundamentally feminine temperament (presumably he was also a latent cross-dresser).
Aubyn) encouraged him to publish a massive, 26-volume folio work on plants, with 1,600 copperplate engravings depicting 26,000 different plants.
Apprenticed in 1771 to an engraver, Blake later illustrated his own work with copperplate engravings and watercolors.
By the second half of the eighteenth century, woodcuts had fallen out of favor in England as a medium for book-illustration, mainly because copperplate engravings seemed so infinitely more subtle and sophisticated.
Printed on folio and beautifully illustrated with over 200 copperplate engravings accompanied by biographical sketches of variable length, this ambitious and costly book was obviously meant to rival that most popular of contemporary publications, Jacques Amyot's translation of Plutarch's Lives.