Coptos

Coptos

(kŏp`təs, –tŏs) or

Coptus

(kŏp`təs), ancient city of Egypt, on the right bank of the Nile, c.27 mi (43 km) N of modern Luxor. Remains of the Temple of Min, patron god of Coptos, have been found there as well as relics from the time of Ramses II and Thutmose III. The town was of importance in Hellenistic times, when it was the terminus of a caravan route to Berenice on the Red Sea. It was built up by Augustus, fell to the Blemmyes in the 3d cent. A.D., and was almost destroyed by Diocletian in A.D. 292. The present-day village of Qift is on the site.
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One stele was left by Minemhat, a 17th-dynasty governor of the province of Coptos, traditionally the nerve-centre for quarrying and mining in the eastern Desert.
Moreover, de Romanis seems unaware that the first station on the road from Coptos to Berenike was el-Matula/Wekalat-el-Mefarik, not at el-Laqeita (ancient Phoenicon?
In the intervening years, much new information about the Roman pottery sequence for the Eastern Desert has been produced by the excavations at Berenike, Coptos, and other sites in the region.
Analysis of some ostraca from the same team's recent excavations at the Roman fort (praesidium) of Didymoi (modern Zeydun/Khashm al-Meniyah) on the ancient route linking Berenike on the Red Sea to Coptos is included, as are those published previously by other projects from Wadi al-Fawakhir and Wadi al-Hammamat, which are also situated on the Myos Hormos-Nile road.
98-138) periods prompted by an upsurge in the Rome-Red Sea-Indian trade passing between Myos Hormos and Coptos, and by a major increase in "barbarian" activity and attacks at that time.
Based on repeated collations, this initial volume is the first of a series intended to cover several hundred rock-graffiti on the Farshut and Alamat Tal routes that cut across the elbow of the high desert jutting eastward into the Nile's course, between Hu and Abydos in the north, Coptos to the east, and Thebes on the south.
The forms of these manifestations were influenced strongly by geography, the temple being located between Coptos and Thebes.
The studies divide into new work at well-known sites like Giza and Saqqara, and at other important but hardly known sites, like Coptos and Shanhur.
Significantly, three Indian fineware sherds have recently been identified amongst Antiquarian finds from Coptos on the Nile (Elaigne 1999; Reinach 1912), the main trans-shipment point between the Red Sea and Alexandria for Indo-Roman trade.
Bowersock, Hellenism in Late Antiquity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 21-27, but they do not mention the oracle from Coptos on the Virgin Birth of the Logos-Son (see above, n.
The capital city of the sixth Upper Egyptian nome, it was close to the prehistoric site of Nagada and the desert roads that led westward toward the oases of the western desert, and in the vicinity of Coptos, the departure point to the mines and quarries of the Eastern Desert and the gateway to the Red Sea.
The weakened and shattered power of Typhon, which still gasps and struggles, is appeased and mollified by them partly by sacrifices, while at other times again they humiliate and insult it in certain festivals, jeering at men of ruddy complexion and throwing an ass down a precipice, (36) as the people of Coptos do, because Typhon had a ruddy complexion (37) and was in asinine form.