Cor Caroli


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Cor Caroli

(kor ka -rŏ-lÿ) (α CVn) A bluish-white star that is the brightest one in the constellation Canes Venatici, Its name means ‘Charles's Heart’ and was given to it by Edmund Halley in honor of the English King Charles II. It is a visual binary (separation 20″), the brighter component (A or α2 CVn) being the prototype of the spectrum variable stars. It has a period of 5.469 days and its spectrum shows strong profuse lines of rare earths, iron-peak elements, and silicon. mv : 2.9 (A), 5.5 (B); spectral type: B9.5 pv (A), F0 V (B).
References in periodicals archive ?
Would you the star of Bacchus find, on noble Virgo's wing, A lengthy ray from Hydra's heart unto Arcturus bring; Two-thirds along that fancied line, direct th' inquiring eye, And there the jewel will be seen, south of Cor Caroli.
Apart from its brightest star Cor Caroli ([eth] CVn - mag.
It lies at RA 13h 15.8m and Dec +42[degrees] 02' (2000.0) which puts it just over 5[degrees] northeast of a CVn (Cor Caroli).
Cor Caroli, the brightest star inside the crook formed by the Bear's tail and hind leg, is another superb, easy double star.
You'll find the Coma Cluster about halfway between bright Beta (([beta]) Leonis (Denebola) and Alpha ([alpha]) Canum Venaticorum (Cor Caroli).
Its saving grace is that its brightest star, magnitude 2.9 Cor Caroli, is a beautiful double star with a magnitude 5.5 companion, easily split in small telescopes and well displayed during April and May.
M3 has no even moderately bright stars nearby to use as guides--so look for it about halfway along the long line between Cor Caroli (Alpha Canum Venaticorum) and Arcturus.
You'll find the galaxy halfway between 3rd-magnitude Cor Caroli, the brightest star in Canes Venatici, and 17 Comae Berenices--which was your starting point for NGC 4565.
The Alpha star, popularly known as Cor Caroli, is a beautiful double.
It's centered about halfway between Beta Leonis (Denebola) and Alpha Canum Venaticorum (Cor Caroli).
Cor Caroli ([alpha] Canum Venaticorum) is a striking unequal pair in even the smallest telescope.