Corals


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Corals

 

coelenterate marine animals, primarily of the class Anthozoa and sometimes of the class Hydrozoa (of the suborder Hydrocorallia). Most corals form a calcareous or, less often, horny skeleton of varying shapes. Accumulations of madrepores form the basis of coral reefs. Coral is also the designation given to the skeletons of animals of the order Gorgonaria, such as red coral and black coral, from which necklaces and other types of jewelry are made.

References in periodicals archive ?
Interactive effects of ocean acidification and temperature on two scleractinian corals from Moorea, French Polynesia.
Sowing the same number of corals could be achieved in less than 50 person-hours, a time saving of over 90 percent.
The global coral bleaching event in 1998 saw 30-50 per cent of corals died.
The study, which was published in the scientific journal PLOS One , sought answers to whether these corals have genetically adapted to these extreme conditions or have physiologically acclimated to the heat.
The study, which was published in the scientific journal PLOS One, sought answers to whether these corals have genetically adapted to these extreme conditions or have physiologically acclimated to the heat.
Corals and microscopic algae called zooxanthellae, have a mutually beneficial relationship where the tine algae gain shelter, carbon dioxide and nutrients while corals get photosynthetic products that can provide them with up to 90% of their energy needs.
Although symbiosis is recognized to be important for the success of today's reefs, it was less clear that that was the case with ancient corals.
I follow him as he hunts for surviving super corals, but there aren't many to be found.
13 to transplant coral fragments, part of a process needed to revive the park's degenerating coral reefs.
In an island lab at the University of Hawaii, she and her team are breeding corals that can survive bleaching.
As reefs take a nose dive, scientists from Hawaii to the Philippines and the Caribbean are scrambling to save corals.
The quest to grow the hearty coral comes at a time when researchers are warning about the dire health of the world's reefs, which create habitats for marine life, protect shorelines and drive tourist economies.