Corcoran, William Wilson

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Corcoran, William Wilson

Corcoran, William Wilson (kôrˈkərən), 1798–1888, American financier, philanthropist, and art collector, b. Georgetown, D.C. After becoming a successful banker, he retired in 1854 and devoted himself to his philanthropic activities, which included gifts to many educational and religious institutions, as well as the founding of the Louise Home for Women in Washington. His chief gift was the Corcoran Gallery of Art, in Washington, which had as its nucleus Corcoran's art collection. It was originally housed in what is now the Renwick Gallery (opened 1874), but outgrew it and moved to the marble building designed by Ernest Flagg (opened 1897); the Clark Wing was added in 1928. The gallery had collections of paintings, sculpture, and ceramics, as well as an art school. In 2014 the Corcoran, which had been suffering severe financial problems, transferred its artworks and galleries to the National Gallery and its Corcoran College of the Arts and Design to George Washington Univ.
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Corcoran, William Wilson

(1798–1888) banker, art collector, philanthropist; born in Georgetown, Wash., D.C. He studied at Georgetown College (now Georgetown University) (c. 1814), joined his brothers in a dry goods business (1815), and later established a banking firm, Corcoran & Riggs (1840). He retired from banking in 1854, and devoted himself to collecting 19th-century American works of art. A supporter of the South during the Civil War, he lived abroad during that time. As a philanthropist he donated substantial sums to many educational, religious, and charitable institutions in America. He founded the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1859 and it was moved to its present location in 1897; his collection still forms the nucleus of the museum.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.
References in periodicals archive ?
Audiences in Washington, D.C., have heard her as a soloist at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Library of Congress and the Kennedy Center Terrace Theater.
When I started my fellowship, the gallery was still in the process of absorbing the holdings of the now sadly defunct Corcoran Gallery of Art. In addition to holding some of the great masterpieces of American art, the Corcoran was also home to a renowned collection of Renaissance maiolica, donated in 1926 by the heirs of the notorious US senator and railroad tycoon William A.
Prior to joining Bozzuto, Goldfarb was Development Director at ProMark Real Estate and spent four years at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., during a capital campaign to build a Frank Gehry-designed expansion.
in the Museum of Modern Art's early years, to the pathbreaking "Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980" at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, which subsequently went on a two-year tour of the nation.
In the six years between his college graduation and enlistment in the Army, the award-winning artist exhibited at the nation's leading museums (including the Carnegie Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and National Academy of Design) as well as the 1939 World's Fair.
She has served at institutions such as the Denver Art Museum, Smithsonian Institution, and Corcoran Gallery of Art. She retired as director of education at the Phoenix Art Museum but continues to lecture and consult, and serves as guest curator at the Sylvia Plotkin Judaica Museum in Phoenix.
An active soloist and chamber musician, he has performed in Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Merkin Hall, and Corcoran Gallery of Art, among others.
In 1982 (the year of her death), Rowe's drawings were included in the Corcoran Gallery of Art's exhibition "Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980," which is regarded as the beginning of American recognition of self-taught artists.
A glamorous premiere and reception at the Corcoran Gallery of Art Monday night hosted by Showtime and its innovative president of entertainment, David Nevins, attracted a gaggle of current agency staffers as well as Michael Hayden, the former CIA director, and Michael Morell, the former acting CIA director.