core loss


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core loss

[′kȯr ‚lȯs]
(electromagnetism)
The rate of energy conversion into heat in a magnetic material due to the presence of an alternating or pulsating magnetic field. Also known as excitation loss; iron loss.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Core loss

The rate of energy conversion into heat in a magnetic material due to the presence of an alternating or pulsating magnetic field. It may be subdivided into two principal components, hysteresis loss and eddy-current loss. See Eddy current

The energy consumed in magnetizing and demagnetizing magnetic material is called the hysteresis loss. It is proportional to the frequency and to the area inside the hysteresis loop for the material used. Most rotating machines are stacked with silicon steel laminations, which have low hysteresis losses. The cores of large units are sometimes built up with cold-reduced, grain-oriented, silicon iron punchings having exceptionally low hysteresis loss, as well as high permeability when magnetized along the direction of rolling.

Induced currents flow within the magnetic material because of variations in the flux; this is called eddy-current loss. For 60-cycle rotating machines, core laminations of 0.014–0.018 in. (0.35–0.45 mm) are usually used to reduce this eddy-current loss. See Electric rotating machinery

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Engineering. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
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For the quarter ended September 30, 2016, core loss (after-tax) and core loss per share, excluding an USD13m pre-tax unfavourable market-related mortgage servicing rights (MSR) fair value adjustment, net of derivative losses related to MSRs, were USD19m and USD0.35, respectively.
Additionally, the P&C industry saw a higher level of favorable development of prior years' core loss reserve, with the combined ratio benefitting by 3.6 points.
The insurance industry saw a higher level of favorable development of prior years' core loss reserve (meaning, those not related to asbestos and environmental losses), with the combined ratio benifitting from 3.6 points.
To determine the equivalent circuit model of core loss and the magnetization phenomena a non-load test was perform at the low voltage side of each transformer circuit was performed.