type II supernova

(redirected from Core-collapse supernova)
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type II supernova

[′tīp ¦tü ¦sü·pər′nō·və]
(astronomy)
A member of a class of supernovae that display prominent lines of hydrogen in their spectra and have irregular light curves; they are believed be explosions of young massive stars, still in possession of their hydrogenic surface layers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ott, "The role of turbulence in neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova explosions," The Astrophysical Journal, vol.
Iair Arcavi (Las Cumbres Observatory) and colleagues thought they were seeing a typical core-collapse supernova when the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) caught the 18thmagnitude explosion dubbed iPTF14hls.
But other evidence argued against a core-collapse supernova. X-ray data from Chandra and XMM-Newton indicated that the object consisted of high amounts of iron, a telltale sign of a Type Ia blast.
According to textbooks, a typical core-collapse supernova goes something like this: Massive stars swell into red supergiants, then, with increasing desperation, they fuse successively heavier elements--helium, carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon--in an attempt to stave off gravity's fatal embrace.
If the blast that produced Cas A came from a core-collapse supernova, as astronomers suspect based on the nature of its remnant, it's a mystery why it wasn't bright enough to be noticed.
Such a star rotates too slowly to form relativistic jets, so it dies as a normal core-collapse supernova without a GRB.
In contrast, a normal core-collapse supernova buries a large inventory of its heavy elements in a black hole or neutron star.
Today a similar core-collapse supernova in our own galaxy would yield thousands of detections.
Only a core-collapse supernova can make heavier elements such as gold.
Every core-collapse supernova for which we have obtained adequate data has been substantially polarized.
If that rate of dust expulsion is typical, it would suggest that core-collapse supernovas have been major producers of dust throughout cosmic history.--R.C.
Fruchter and his colleagues compared the character of the burst galaxies with the homes of 16 core-collapse supernovas, explosions of massive stars that leave behind either a neutron star or a black hole.