coriander

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coriander

(kōr'ēăn`dər), strong-smelling Old World annual herb (Coriandrum sativum) of the family Umbelliferae (parsleyparsley,
Mediterranean aromatic herb (Petroselinum crispum or Apium petroselinum) of the carrot family, cultivated since the days of the Romans for its foliage, used in cookery as a seasoning and garnish.
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 family), cultivated for its fruits. Dried coriander seed contains an aromatic oil used as a flavoring, as a medicine, and in liqueurs. The seed itself is used as a spice similarly to that of the related caraway and cumin. Coriander is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae.
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cilantro
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cilantro
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cilantro

cilantro

Yes, cilantro and coriander are the same thing. Flowers and seeds taste like the leaves. Use raw. Used to chelate heavy metals out of the body. A very cleansing green. Use leaves, roots, seeds, the whole thing.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

coriander

[‚kȯr·ē′an·dər]
(botany)
Coriandrum sativum. A strong-scented perennial herb in the order Umbellales; the dried fruit is used as a flavoring.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

coriander

a European umbelliferous plant, Coriandrum sativum, widely cultivated for its aromatic seeds and leaves, used in flavouring food, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005