Coriolis effect


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Related to Coriolis effect: Coriolis force

Coriolis effect

(kôr'ē-ō`lĭs) [for G.-G. de Coriolis, a French mathematician], tendency for any moving body on or above the earth's surface, e.g., an ocean current or an artillery round, to drift sideways from its course because of the earth's rotation. In the Northern Hemisphere the deflection is to the right of the motion; in the Southern Hemisphere it is to the left. The Coriolis deflection of a body moving toward the north or south results from the fact that the earth's surface is rotating eastward at greater speed near the equator than near the poles, since a point on the equator traces out a larger circle per day than a point on another latitude nearer either pole. A body traveling toward the equator with the slower rotational speed of higher latitudes tends to fall behind or veer to the west relative to the more rapidly rotating earth below it at lower latitudes. Similarly, a body traveling toward either pole veers eastward because it retains the greater eastward rotational speed of the lower latitudes as it passes over the more slowly rotating earth closer to the pole. It is extremely important to account for the Coriolis effect when considering projectile trajectories, terrestrial wind systems, and ocean currents.

Coriolis effect

[kȯr·ē′ō·ləs i′fekt]
(mechanics)
Also known as Coriolis deflection.
The deflection relative to the earth's surface of any object moving above the earth, caused by the Coriolis force; an object moving horizontally is deflected to the right in the Northern Hemisphere, to the left in the Southern.
The effect of the Coriolis force in any rotating system.
(physiology)
The physiological effects (nausea, vertigo, dizziness, and so on) felt by a person moving radially in a rotating system, as a rotating space station.

Coriolis effect

Coriolis effectclick for a larger image
Coriolis effect
Displacement of the vertical caused by random acceleration.
i. The apparent effect of a number of forces that act upon a body or particle set in motion on the earth's surface, tending to divert the moving object to the right of its path in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. A correction must be made when navigation relative to the earth is considered. See Coriolis force.
ii. The change in rotor blade velocity to compensate for a change in the distance between the center of mass of the rotor blade and the axis of rotation of the blade as the blades flap in flight. Rotor blades accelerate when their center of gravity moves closer to the center of rotation and decelerate when it moves farther away. Rotor blades accelerate and decelerate accompanied with the rotor blades flapping.
iii. The displacement of the apparent horizon, as defined by the bubble in a sextant by acceleration, caused by an aircraft flying in a nonlinear path in space.
iv. The tendency of a mass to increase or decrease its angular velocity when its radius of rotation is changed. More correctly called the conservation of angular momentum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The country lies within the equatorial zone 5o North and 5o South where Coriolis effect is zero.
Note that even if the vorticity vector in (4) is only time dependent, that is, without spatial dependence, the Coriolis effect gives rise to the vorticity.
Now let's move on to Coriolis Effect. Once you turn a bullet loose into the atmosphere, the Earth turns independent of it, and believe it or not, the Earth's movement can reposition the target during the bullet's flight enough to make you miss at extreme range.
The two vibrating tubes rotate around the two fixed end points, creating a Coriolis effect when mass flows through.
The first to use three-dimensional models, Barranco investigated the Coriolis Effect, the same mechanism that produces cyclones and tornadoes on earth, and vertical shear.
Thanks to the Coriolis effect my sense of what is normal is completely warped.
Yeagley believed that the pigeon's 'homing' instinct was linked to the earth's electro-magnetic field and the 'coriolis effect' of the planet's rotation.
The problem of tides is that of a fluid motion modified by the geometry (including depth) of ocean basins, by friction, and by such forces as the Coriolis effect due to Earth's rotation.
"Scattered Voices" was written in homage to humanity, while "Coriolis Effect" gets its title from the effect that determines the swirl direction of water going down the drain.
Today, it is almost commonplace to measure the Coriolis effect; models are small and light enough to hold in one hand and require very little support in a pipeline, making them useful in a wider number of applications.
The heart of the vibrating structure gyroscope is a tiny ring vibrating in a small box; the Coriolis effect is used to calculate the angular rate, according to Field.