Cormorants


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Cormorants

 

(Phalacrocoracidae), afamily of birds of the order Pelecaniformes.

Cormorants are excellent divers and underwater swimmers. The plumage of most cormorants is black. The length of the body ranges from 55 cm (pygmy cormorant) to 92 cm (European cormorant). The family includes two genera: Nannopterum (one flightless species), found on the Galapagos Islands, and true cormorants, or Phalacrocorax, found in Europe, North America, Asia, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. In the USSR there are six species: European, green, pelagic, red-faced, Temminck’s, and pygmy cormorants. Until the middle of the 19th century, Pallas’ cormorant, a flightless bird, lived on Bering Island. Cormorants nest in colonies on rocks or in trees. They feed on fish; this sometimes harms the fishing industry.

REFERENCE

Ptitsy Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 1. Edited by G. P. Dement’ev and N. A. Gladkov. Moscow, 1951.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was once believed that the decline in sea fish stocks around our coasts was a reason cormorants were coming inland.
The herons range from Saco Bay to Muscongus Bay and the cormorants from outer Penobscot Bay to Jericho Bay, he said.
Webbed feet and that snake-like neck make cormorants supreme fishers.
But cormorants and goosanders are not exactly endangered.
The WCS team has tracked more than 400 cormorants along the Patagonian Coast of Argentina using cutting edge technological tools such as multi-channel archival tags and high resolution GPS-loggers.
Other colonies of Socotra cormorants in the UAE are found on some of Abu Dhabi's islands such as Umm Qasar, Yasat Island and Dina Island, said Dr Salim Javed, ecologist at EAD.
TV host and lifelong angler Chris Tarrant said:"It has taken absurdly long for people to realise the damage to fish populations, other wildlife and the whole environment cormorants have been doing for too many years.
A similar connection has been drawn on Minnesota's Leech Lake, where more than 2,500 cormorants a year have been culled for four years in a row.
In the Far East - Japan and China in particular - cormorants are tamed and used to catch fish for their owners.
In any event, researcher Dan Roby says cormorants have replaced Caspian terns as champion consumers of young Columbia Basin salmonids migrating toward the Pacific Ocean.
Prof Graham Martin and his team have found that cormorants are the underwater equivalent of herons, taking prey only at short range and by stealth, flushing fish out from hiding places and grabbing them with a rapid lunge of the neck.
TIDAL AND INSIDE-SEASON EFFECTS ON THE DIVING BEHAVIOR OF PELAGIC CORMORANTS (Phalacrocorax pelagicus Pallas, 1811) AT CATTLE POINT, SAN JUAN ISLAND, WASHINGTON, U.S.A