Corner lot

Corner lot

A lot which abuts two or more streets at their point of intersection.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

corner lot

A lot of which at least two adjacent sides abut upon streets or public places, for their full length, which must not be less than a code-specified distance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
And I can see my corner lots selling out for more than your hen-scratching ever turned up on Birch Creek."
Indeed, the L-shaped edifice, which Sachse described as "mid-century modern," occupies a prominent corner lot at 17th Street and Rhode Island Avenue--right between the White House and Dupont Circle, the latter being the center of the city's large gay and lesbian community.
Jacobs chose Rainy River for this project because it represented a "corner lot of Ontario" with excellent transportation links to the U.S., Manitoba and Ontario, attractive land prices and a moderate labor pool to draw from.
Living on a corner lot can, literally, have its setbacks.
* A 5,000 s/f prime free standing corner lot at 11 Homans Ave.
The best characteristics of a berm and of privacy planting combine in the remodeled landscape of this corner lot. Before, two sides of the house were exposed to view and to noise from the intersecting streets.
"It's rare that a prime corner lot in one of the city's hottest neighborhoods becomes available.
The new apartment house is set on a corner lot that measures 26 feet by 150 feet.
As opposed to building on a corner lot, HRH has little room to maneuver cranes and other heavy equipment, creating a unique logistical situation.
She referred to the property's location on a corner lot that yields unobstructed light and views south and west from panoramic window walls.
"Before, you really had to achieve a certain amount of keys to justify the costs of running a hotel, but the boutiques have done so well in Manhattan-those located on side streets with 75 to 125 rooms on 50ft lots and not the 350 room corner lots that were so typical of New York in the past--and are demonstrating there's enough demand for those rooms without having all the bells and whistles of a five-star hotel."