Coronium


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Coronium

 

a hypothetical chemical element to which the formation of emission lines in the spectrum of the sun’s corona was ascribed. In 1939–40 it was established that the observed coronal lines are actually caused by a number of electron transitions in highly ionized elements, namely, iron, nickel, calcium, and argon.

References in periodicals archive ?
The true nature of coronium had puzzled solar physicists ever since the total solar eclipse of August 1, 1869, a widely witnessed event that was visible from Alaska to North Carolina.
Superimposed on the continuous spectrum of the inner K-corona are emission lines, including one at 5303.3 A, the famous line from coronium, first discovered by Harkness and Young [2,3], photographed by Evershed [4], and eventually identified as FeXIV by Bengt Edlen [5-7].
It's still known as the coronal "green line" and was said at first to have come from the element coronium. Only when the periodic table of elements was nearly complete did it became obvious that there was no room left in the table for coronium.
The identification of Coronium would follow a parallel story [134-136].
The line was first attributed to a new chemical element and dubbed coronium, but was later identified by Bengt Edlen as iron stripped of half its electrons by the torturous heat of the corona.