Pienza

(redirected from Corsignano)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pienza

 

a city in central Italy, in Siena Province. Pienza was built as a result of a decree issued by Pope Pius II (Enea Silvio de’ Piccolomini), after whom the city was named. Pius II wanted to construct a new city on the site of his birthplace, the village of Corsignano. Pienza’s regular street layout (from 1459) was designed by B. Rossellino, as were a number of late-15th-century buildings, including the hall-type cathedral, the Palazzo Piccolomini, and the Palazzo Comunale. The Palazzo Vescovile also dates to this period. Pienza is the site of a diocesan museum of religious art.

REFERENCE

Carli, E. Pienza, la città di Pio II. Rome [1966].
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
So much to see, do and taste: sample pecorino cheeses in Castello di Corsignano, and taste wine in the picturesque hill town of Montalcino; peruse treasures of Florentine art on an expertly guided stroll through the center of Florence, followed by a cooking class employing fresh regional products; travel to lovely Lucca for a walking tour to the San Martino Cathedral, the Roman amphitheater and more before visiting a family pasta factory, savoring a Tuscan farmhouse lunch, and viewing the famous Leaning Tour of Pisa.
Although Pienza was given new life through the irresistible will of its papal patron, its aesthetic rebirth as a demonstration of Renaissance taste did not signal the total demise of the medieval town of Corsignano that it replaced.
In February 1459, when Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini returned to his birthplace of Corsignano as the newly-elected Pope Pius II, he found its medieval buildings, like their inhabitants, "bowed down with old age." (3) During the next five years, Pius devoted much energy and a significant portion of the papal treasury to revitalizing his native town which he caused to be renamed in June 1462, as a memorial to himself, Pienza.
The metamorphosis of medieval Corsignano into Renaissance Pienza represented a multi-level endeavor which, although likely left unfinished at the death of its patron, did forever alter the structural and environmental fabric of the Tuscan hill town (Fig.
The small village of Corsignano (birthplace of the Piccolomini Pope, Pius II) was transformed into modern day Pienza between 1459 and 1464, signaling the birth of conscientious town planning in Renaissance Italy.
I assessed the unwrapped half-wheel of Pecorino Corsignano (a delightful aged Italian sheep's-milk cheese) and unrolled what I had calculated to be the proper amount of plastic.