carrion crow

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Related to Corvus corone: Hooded Crow

carrion crow

a common predatory and scavenging European crow, Corvus corone, similar to the rook but having a pure black bill

Carrion Crow

 

(Corvus cor one), a bird of the family Corvidae, order Passeriformes. The length of its body ranges from 44 to 56 cm. Carrion crows are divided into two groups according to coloring. These groups are sometimes considered as two independent species: carrion crows proper (black plumage with a metallic gloss) and hooded crows (grey plumage with black). Hybrid crows of an intermediate color are commonly found in bordering areas of distribution. Carrion crows inhabit Europe, Asia (excluding the south and southeast), and northeast Africa (the lower reaches of the Nile). In the USSR the hooded crow is widely distributed in the east to the Enisei River, in the south to Middle Asia, and in Turkmenia. The carrion crow proper in-habits the remaining regions. In the northern part of its area of distribution the carrion crow is a migratory bird; in the southern part it is sedentary. It nests in forests, parks, floodland plantings, and the like; in the winter it commonly nests in cities and towns. The nests are placed in trees, and when there are no trees, in bushes and even in reed-blockings in rivers. Laying (4-5 eggs) occurs between the end of March and May. An omnivorous bird, the carrion crow causes serious harm in some places by destroying the nests of game birds, especially duck nests. Species similar to the Corvus corone inhabit North America (C. brachyrhynchos) and south and southeast Asia (C. macrorhynchos).

G. P. DEMENT’EV

References in periodicals archive ?
1985: Nest density, breeding habitat and reproductive output in a population of the hooded crow Corvus corone cornix on Karmoy, SW Norway.--Fauna Norvegica, Series C, 8: 1-8.
Other corvid species, such as the carrion crow (Corvus corone) or the jackdaw (C.
Although Plasmodium parasites were not detected in blood smears and tissues collected from the penguins, various blood parasites were recorded in blood smears from wild Eurasian magpies (Pica pica) and carrion crows (Corvus corone) sampled at the same time in the study area.
In August 2002, in southern Finland, a diseased wild hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) was found flying abnormally with coordination problems, abnormal postures, cramps, and paralysis.
Current geographic distribution of corvids indicates that these likely were ravens (Corvus corax) and not crows (Corvus corone sardonius or other crow species).
Twenty-eight mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), 2 hooded crows (Corvus corone cornix), and 3 coypus (Myocastor coypus) were found moribund on the Crostolo stream bank, collected, and sent to Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia Romagna, Reggio Emilia Section.