Corybantes


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Corybantes

half-divine priests of Cybele; celebrated noisy festivals in her honor. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 67]

Corybantes

musicians; provided music for goddesses’ orgiastic dances. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 67]
See: Music
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(But the variation in these accounts is so small that, whereas some represent the Corybantes, the Cabeiri, the Ideaean Dactyli, and the Telchines as identical with the Curetes, others represent them as all kinsmen of one another and differentiate only certain small matters in which they differ in respect of one another ...; translation Jones, with modifications).
Thus the composers of lyrical poetry create those admired songs of theirs in a state of divine insanity, like the Corybantes [followers of the goddess Cybele, who worshipped her with wild dances and music], who lose all control over their reason in the enthusiasm of the sacred dance.
At the High School of Performing Arts, Williams met his colleague, choreographer Eleo Pomare, with whom he danced at community centers, and even created a dance company, the Corybantes. Ailey saw Williams dance one of Pomare's solos, Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night, in the late 1950s.
24) is probably more confusing than informative for most readers; corybantes, known for wild dancing in armor, appear in classical sources as mythical attendants or priests of the goddess Cybele.
Her mythical attendants, the Corybantes, were wild, half-demonic beings.
In her rites, she was always associated with the corybantes, a group of young men who dance and play musical instruments.
Or again, when Chaucer explains that Corybantes think lunar eclipses are due to magic, and therefore bang basins so the moon cannot hear the spell ('to rescowe the mone thei betyn hir basyns with thikke strokkes'), Machan (p.