Corynebacteria


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Corynebacteria

 

a group of bacteria, whose cell form and life cycle resemble those of mycobacteria. A number of their biochemical and physiological characteristics differ from those of mycobacteria. These bacteria are apparently related to the actinomycetes. The best-known representative of Corynebacteria is Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the causative agent of diphtheria. This bacterium contains the nuclei of volutin at the end of the cells; a powerful toxin forms that can cause paralysis of the soft palate, the extremities, and the heart muscle.

References in periodicals archive ?
Nosocomial endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium amycolatum and other non-diphtheriae corynebacteria. Emerg infect Dis.
Our results highlight the need to identify corynebacteria to the species level, which is now readily performed by using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and perform susceptibility testing for any isolate that is believed to be clinically meaningful.
Results: Among 493 (44.1%) cases detected positive for corynebacteria 71.8 per cent were pharyngeal, 20.9 per cent nasopharyngeal and rest 7.3 per cent nasal diphtheria cases.
Comparison of phenotypic and genotypic methods for detection of diphtheria toxin among isolates of pathogenic corynebacteria. J Clin Microbiol 1998;36:3173-7.
However, the extract was highly effective against selected aerobic and anaerobic bacteria such as Streptococcae, Corynebacteria, C.
Oudin et al., "First description of NOD2 variant associated with defective neutrophil responses in a woman with granulomatous mastitis related to corynebacteria," Journal of Clinical Microbiology, vol.
Non diphtherial Corynebacteria also cause chronic and subclinical diseases in domestic animals and lead to significant economic losses for farmers.
A modified Elek test for detection of toxigenic corynebacteria in the diagnostic laboratory.
Since introduction of vaccine against the diphtheria toxin in the 1940s, infections caused by toxigenic corynebacteria have been well controlled in industrialized countries that have high coverage rates of childhood vaccination with 3 doses of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine (1).
Clinical diphtheria is caused by toxin-producing corynebacteria. Three species (Corynebacterium diphtheriae, C.
diphtheriae isolates sent during 1993 through 2010 to the French National Reference Centre of Toxigenic Corynebacteria. The isolates came from metropolitan France and French overseas departments and territories.