Coryphaenidae

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Coryphaenidae

[‚kȯr·ə′fēn·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of pelagic fishes in the order Perciformes characterized by a blunt nose and deeply forked tail.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Coryphaenidae

 

a family of fish of the order Perciformes. The body is elongated, reaching up to 2 m (in the common dolphin, or dorado [ Coryphaena hippuris]), and compressed at the sides; the scales are small. The dorsal fin is long, and the caudal fin is forked. There is one genus comprising two species. The fish are distributed in warm and temperate seas. The Coryphaenidae are pelagicfish.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Mahon (1999) called attention on the lack of catch reports for Coryphaena hippurus originating from recreational fisheries in some countries, including Brazil, from 1970-1997.
The species were the following: bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus); albacore (Thunnus alalunga); longnose lancetfish (Alepisaurus ferox); blue shark (Prionace glauca); dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus), also known as mahi mahi; skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamisY, yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares); striped marlin (Kajikia audax); sickle pomfret (Taractichthys steindachneri); snake mackerel (Gempylus serpens); and escolar (Lepidocybium flavobrunneum).
Synopsis of the biological data on dolphin-fishes, Coryphaena hippurus Linnaeus and Corphaena equiselis Linnaeus.
16 Photomicrograph of an otolith of a dolphin fish Coryphaena hippurus showing the daily growth increments (arrows).
off the coast of northern Peru have been studied little and have been described only as fauna associated with prospections associated with the Peruvian anchoveta fishery in the northern Humboldt ecosystem (between 4-16[degrees]S and 0-148 km from shore) (IMARPE (4)) and as a component of the diet of dolphin-fish (Coryphaena hippurus) (Solano et al., 2015).
Considering all species subject to exploitation by the sport fishing fleet in this region, striped marlin represents 21.7%, Pacific blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) 3.4%, sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) 2.6%, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) 46.4% and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) 19% (Klett-Traulsen et al., 1996).
In Southern California, anglers can take half-day or full-day trips targeting species such as yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares; albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga; dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus; and yellow tail, Seriola lalandi dorsalis.
The most abundant species were Eleutheronema tetradactylum (fourfinger threadfin), Otolithes ruber (tigertooth croaker), Pampus argenteus (silver pomfret), Scomberomorus commerson (narrow-barred Spanish mackerel), Scomberomorus guttatus (Indo-Pacific king mackerel), Pomadasys kaakan (javelin grunter), Epinephelus coioides (orange-spotted grouper), Thunnus tonggol (longtail tuna), Dussumieria (rainbow sardines), Coryphaena hippurus (mahi-mahi), Acanthopagrus latus (yellowfin seabream) and Cynoglossus arel (largescale tonguesole) [2,3] (Figure 1).