sine wave

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Sine wave

A wave having a form which, if plotted, would be the same as that of a trigonometric sine or cosine function. The sine wave may be thought of as the projection on a plane of the path of a point moving around a circle at uniform speed. It is characteristic of one-dimensional vibrations and one-dimensional waves having no dissipation. See Harmonic motion

The sine wave is the basic function employed in harmonic analysis. It can be shown that any complex motion in a one-dimensional system can be described as the superposition of sine waves having certain amplitude and phase relationships. The technique for determining these relationships is known as Fourier analysis. See Wave equation, Wave motion

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Physics. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sine wave

[′sīn ‚wāv]
(physics)
A wave whose amplitude varies as the sine of a linear function of time. Also known as sinusoidal wave.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sine wave

A wave form containing only one frequency; the amplitude of the periodic oscillation is a sinusoidal function of time. Also see pure tone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sine wave

(mathematics)
A waveform of a single constant frequency and amplitude that continues for all time.

Compare wavelet.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

sine wave

A continuous, uniform wave with a constant frequency and amplitude. See wavelength.


A Sine Wave
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References in periodicals archive ?
Newer sensors coming to market interpolate signals developed from sine and cosine waves. These sensors only require single pole-pair magnets, which are inexpensive and readily available.
The product of two sinusoids is equal to the sum of two cosine waves at the sum and difference of the two original frequencies.
Resolvers generate analog output as a pair of sine waves, out of phase by 90 degrees, called sine and cosine waves. Like potentiometers, resolvers can only monitor position within a single 360-degree rotation, and by themselves cannot track where the patient tabletop is located along the x-axis path of travel in excess of a single rotation.
An appendix provides details of Gaussian or normal statistics as they apply to noise and the cancellation and balance of cosine waves related to fading.
The optical system outputs sine and cosine waves with DC components canceled out.