Cosmic Background Explorer


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Cosmic Background Explorer:

see infrared astronomyinfrared astronomy,
study of celestial objects by means of the infrared radiation they emit, in the wavelength range from about 1 micrometer to about 1 millimeter. All objects, from trees and buildings on the earth to distant galaxies, emit infrared (IR) radiation.
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Cosmic Background Explorer

See COBE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Viewing the fluctuations with 45 times the sensitivity and 33 times the spatial resolution of its predecessor, the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite, WMAP has nailed down several key cosmological parameters.
These parts-per-million temperature fluctuations were first discovered in 1990 by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, and they have been studied in much more detail by other instruments (S&T: September 1999, page 44).
Mather's story takes him from his early days of "growing up nerdish" to great accomplishments at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center as head of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) science team.
261), wherein Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) findings are surpassed by BOOMERANG (Balloon Observations of Millimeter Extragalactic Radiation and Geophysics) data, can you help me understand what happened to the Microwave Anistrophy Probe (MAP)?
In 1992, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite became the first detector to observe the tiny temperature fluctuations in the microwave background.
Stars and galaxies formed in tremendous numbers much sooner after the Big Bang than astronomers once thought, according to observations by the European Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and a recent analysis of infrared data collected by NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE).
In 1991, the Cosmic Background Explorer first revealed fluctuations in the microwave background but averaged temperature variations over huge patches of sky.
Tools" treats physical instruments for understanding the universe from Fermilab to the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite and conceptual tools such as "feedback loops," "models," and "patience.
And sixth, a tentative detection of bumps and wiggles in the cosmic microwave background radiation, over smaller parts of the sky than those first seen by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite (diagnostic for the combination [[Omega].
The variations, a few ten-thousandths of a kelvin, were detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite.
Arendt of Raytheon STX at the Goddard Space Flight Center constructed the new map using data gathered by the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite.
1996) typifies the misinformation reported about the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite.