inflationary universe cosmology

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inflationary universe cosmology

[in′flā·shə‚ner·ē ′yü·nə‚vərs käz′mäl·ə·jē]
(astronomy)
A theory of the evolution of the early universe which asserts that at some early time the observable universe underwent a period of exponential expansion, during which the scale of the universe increased by at least 28 orders of magnitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
But this answers a different problem and identifies a possible energy source for the cosmic inflation theory.
The team of cosmologists using the sensitive telescope and array of sensors known as BICEP2, based at the South Pole, announced the discovery of evidence for cosmic inflation confirming the Big Bang theory of the creation of the universe.
30) Cosmic inflation and string theory--at least in principle--provide mechanisms for generating different kinds of universes with differing laws, structures, and initial conditions.
The theory of cosmic inflation, in which the early universe expanded rapidly, bears a mathematical similarity to Hoyle's creation of matter, and in some variations it places the Big Bang's universe inside a larger, older cosmos.
He notes with approval the argument that it is more likely there is a God who designed the universe with us in mind than that cosmic inflation led to us naturally Considering that the God assumption has no physical evidence to back it up, this is a leap of faith indeed.
They want to talk about neutrino oscillations, Higgs bosons, cosmic inflation, and quantum weirdness-the things that excite them.
Could cosmic inflation be a sign that our universe is in a far vaster realm?
Although inflation does explain the origin of large-scale structures in the cosmos and why the universe appears isotropic, we do not have any proof that this inflation took place, and a potential discovery of primordial gravitational waves - something that was hailed as a "smoking gun" of cosmic inflation - was (http://www.
For polarization, there's still no sign of primordial B-modes, the swirly polarization patterns that would be the signal from spacetime ripples triggered by cosmic inflation.
The origin of the universe--with concepts such as the Big Bang, cosmic inflation, dark matter and dark energy--could become this overarching story for all humankind.
The answer lies in the theory of cosmic inflation, first developed by MIT physicist Alan Guth and now widely accepted among cosmologists.
The cosmic inflation theory attempts to solve this problem by suggesting that in the first few seconds of the universe's existence, regions of space-time that are now separated by billions of light-years were in contact, allowing the temperature to even out.