cost-benefit analysis

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Cost-benefit analysis

A method of evaluating projects or investments by comparing the present value or annual value of expected benefits to costs; the practical embodiment of discounted cash flow analysis; a useful technique for making transparent the benefits of upfront investments in sustainable design features or technologies.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

cost-benefit analysis

a technique for appraising the total economic costs and benefits (and ideally the total social costs and benefits expressed as economic costs) arising from any economic and social activity, especially new projects. Hitherto, the technique has been mainly used to appraise new, large, public projects. But, in an increasingly ecologically conscious era, the proposal now is that many more existing economic and social activities should be subject to full cost-benefit analysis, with many more costs, e.g. environmental, also included to a fuller extent than previously Cost-benefit analysis is far from being a straightforward technique, however, and much depends on the assumptions on which a costing is made. Careful attention has always to be given to the range of external costs and the range of benefits to be included in the calculations, as well as to the basis on which these can be costed. The results usually leave scope for controversy.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

cost-benefit analysis

An analysis of a construction contract with the objective of identifying all the included costs and evaluating their benefits.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(100.) The cost-benefit "compliance alternative" in this rule also goes beyond the Phase I variance in other ways: the Phase I variance more clearly placed the entire burden of justifying a variance on the applicant; it required that the costs of a technology at a specific site be "wholly disproportionate to"--rather than "significantly greater than"--the costs EPA had assumed in writing the rule; and it did not provide that it was acceptable not to do anything in response to the rule if the costs were high enough in relation to the benefits.
To be sure, he makes a strong argument that cost-benefit analysis has the power to be good analysis.
In fact, we should be glad that earlier generations were not tethered to cost-benefit analysis.
Therefore, in order to fully analyze the cost-benefit of CSP in China, this study selected SP, NPV, NPVR, and IRR as measured indicators to calculate and discuss the cost-benefit of ST, PT, and LF-CSP technologies, respectively.
In the model base, fleet investment decision model and cost-benefit analysis model are included into the multi-criteria decision analysis module (See Fig.
Coupling cost-benefit analysis with related means of assessing programmatic costs and effectiveness, the project partners with state and county governments, offering a free toolkit that enables policymakers to direct public funds to activities that deliver high returns and to eliminate or restructure programs found wanting.
In fact, the PTO deemed its fee-setting regulations economically significant, triggering the agency's obligation to conduct cost-benefit analysis.
Scalia, demonstrating his propensity for revisionist history, neglected to note that the EPA actually did complete a thorough cost-benefit analysis - more than once, in fact, during the years that it took to complete the regulatory process.
Coates IV, Towards Better Cost-Benefit Analysis: An Essay on Regulatory Management, 78 Law & Contemp.
On cost-benefit analysis, many industry groups have largely abandoned their commitment to weighing environmental benefits against economic costs.
They warn that the case for transport investment is often understated because existing "cost-benefit" ratios fail to recognise the potential value of projects.
Rules associated with cost-benefit analyses take the longest to review, and longer review times often mean the final rules are less stringent than the ones proposed initially.

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