cottonwood

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cottonwood:

see willowwillow,
common name for some members of the Salicaceae, a family of deciduous trees and shrubs of worldwide distribution, especially abundant from north temperate to arctic areas.
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cottonwood

cottonwood

Tall tree, to 150 ft. Name derived from seeds having cottony parachutes. Bark contains salicylin- the same natural aspirin found in willow trees. Inner bark tea used for overall health and well-being.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

cottonwood

[′kät·ən‚wu̇d]
(botany)
Any of several poplar trees (Populus) having hairy, encapsulated fruit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, cottonwoods are now scarce to nonexistent along certain mid-western and southwestern watercourses where they once thrived.
The cessation of grazing in the woodland has had an effect also, because cattle prefer the taste of cottonwoods and willows.
The virgin forest of cottonwoods that once formed a rounded grove, the Bosque Redondo, was cut in the 1860s to build Fort Sumner and fuel the fires for hundreds of soldiers and civilians who lived at the fort, as well as the 9,000 nomadic Native Americans who were forced to live on the surrounding reservation But by the end of 1863, the complete harvesting of the native cottonwood groves led to a fuel shortage for the fort and the surrounding reservation as well as severe erosion problem that caused the earthen irrigation ditches to wash out the reservation's farmland.
Instead of raising seedlings in a nursery, they used willow and cottonwoods' unique ability to sprout new roots wherever they touch water or moist soil.
"With Cottonwoods, we have the opportunity to take a very well-located property and add significant value through a top-to-bottom renovation program that will bring the property in line with the best multifamily properties in the area."
"A Cottonwood Stand" is a blending of two stories from two different times and two different cultures that are connected, told and wound into one--each of them exploring social issues and themes that are vital and timeless and relevant to us all.
Growing cottonwoods for biomass: results of a ten-year irrigation study.
In a previous analysis (Smith et al., 2009), we found that nests constructed by black-chinned hummingbirds at low heights in nonnative vegetation along the Middle Rio Grande had higher survival rates than those constructed in cottonwoods. In our study, we found similar results comparing nest survival at mean nest heights among Russian olive, saltcedar, and boxelder.
In 2009 we measured the girth and tagged 96 female and 49 male cottonwoods. We visually estimated the level of damage, and ranked it from 0 to 5, with level 5 representing destruction of much of the canopy (Fig.
Cottonwoods have a special resonance for most Westerners, perhaps because the trees, called alamo in Spanish and commemorated in hundreds of western place names, mark the presence of water and the surprising diversity of life it nourishes in these thirsty landscapes.
Case in point, the cottonwood tree (Populus deltoides) in the willow family.