Coulomb force


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Coulomb force

[′kü‚läm ‚fȯrs]
(electricity)
The electrostatic force of attraction or repulsion exerted by one charged particle on another, in accordance with Coulomb's law.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, while there is a(n electromagnetic) field around the conductor, the definition of current is the movement of electrons through the conductor, driven typically by coulomb forces. And, in good healthy synergy, we note the current flows though the conductor, while the energy flows in the electromagnetic field around the conductor.
5 that Coulomb force strength has an influence to air velocity, but almost no influence to vectors direction, because the ratio of spatial force components vary insignificantly, only changes their module.
The intrinsic charge ratio [c.sub.in] is likely to have consequences when considering the mutual Coulomb forces.
In this explanation of the formation of an ionic bond, while the role of the Coulomb force is clear, it is not clear what makes the electron from the donor atom migrate to the acceptor atom.
The static Coulomb force between two like, charged particles can be expressed in the following two forms:
For any pair of fundamental particles of unit charge [+ or -] esu there seems to exist a dimensionless factor of proportionality [[rho].sub.1,2], which, if made a coefficient of G, will balance the electrostatic Coulomb force and the Newtonian force of gravity at any distance between the charged particles.
Lenard, "Exact statistical mechanics of a one-dimensional system with Coulomb forces," Journal of Mathematical Physics, vol.
He uses a unitary transformation which yields wave functions which do not undergo Coulomb forces. In quantum chromodynamics, the light cone gauge is used because then only transverse gluons remain [4].
To describe the operating point of CMUT we used the spring and Coulomb forces as the functions of the gap.
Such systems include gravitational forces, Coulomb forces in globally charged systems, wave-particle interactions, and magnets with dipolar interactions.
The opening chapters review the history of inorganic solar cells, the development of molecular and polymeric devices, the simulation of optical processes, and Coulomb forces in excitonic solar cells.
If this model reproduced some features of nature, the two types of long-range forces which we find, gravitational and Coulomb forces, would be described in a geometrical manner with the degrees of freedom of space-time only.