Coulomb scattering

Coulomb scattering

[kü′läm ‚skad·ə·riŋ]
(physics)
A collision of two charged particles in which the Coulomb force is the dominant interaction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A sufficiently fair number of carriers available at rather low vertical fields (low inversion charge density) provide an insight into the energy efficiency of process despite the Coulomb scattering phenomenon usually responsible for limited mobility.
The primary channel resistance limiting mechanisms, namely, trapping, Coulomb scattering, Surface phonon and surface roughness scattering will be reviewed.
Moreover, by exploiting Multiple Coulomb Scattering and emulsion ionization measurements, one can obtain accurate measurements of the particle momenta.
The so-called net-scan method [39], also developed in Nagoya, eventually allowed for the reconstruction of tracks by associating all detected track segments independently of their angle and allowed complete event reconstruction [40], momentum determination by Multiple Coulomb Scattering [41, 42] and electron identification by shower analysis [43, 44].
Once one or more vertices are found one can exploit all the rich information stored in the emulsions for a Multiple Coulomb Scattering (MCS) analysis (for track momentum determination) or for the search of electron- or gamma-induced downstream showers.
Tzanakos et al., "Momentum measurement of secondary particle by multiple coulomb scattering with emulsion cloud chamber in DONuT experiment," Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A, vol.
Among the topics there are the partial wave expansion method, Coulomb scattering, and spin and identical particles.
For example, in the neutron [beta]-decay experiments the limitation arises from electron-proton Coulomb scattering.