Count Galeazzo Ciano

Ciano, Count Galeazzo

 

Born Mar. 18, 1903, in Livorno (Leghorn); died Jan. 11, 1944, in Verona. State and political figure in fascist Italy, diplomat. Son-in-law of the fascist dictator B. Mussolini.

Ciano entered diplomatic service in 1925, and from 1936 to 1943 he was foreign minister. During World War II—as a result of the disastrous military situation for Italy and the onset of crisis for the fascist regime—Ciano in late 1942 joined the faction of the Italian ruling circle that favored a separate peace treaty. In February 1943, Ciano was removed from his ministerial post. He joined a conspiracy against Mussolini, and on July 25, 1943, he voted in the Grand Council of Fascism to remove Mussolini from power. After the occupation of Italy by fascist German troops (September 1943), Ciano was interned in Germany and handed over to the fascist authorities of the puppet Italian Socialist Republic that had been formed in northern Italy. Ciano was sentenced by a fascist military tribunal and executed by firing squad.

References in periodicals archive ?
(L-R) British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, French Premier Edouard Daladier, German Chancellor Adolf Hitler, Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini and Italian Foreign Minister, Count Galeazzo Ciano meeting in Munich, October 1938
Colonel Terzo also wanted combat duty in the forthcoming war, but Count Galeazzo Ciano, Mussolini's minister of foreign affairs, had other plans for him and gave him the assignment of writing the history of the war, a post he held until external forces toppled the whole regime -- i.e., until the Americans arrived in Rome in 1944.
Mussolini's Shadow: The Double Life of Count Galeazzo Ciano. Ray Moseley.
Mussolini's Shadow The Double Life of Count Galeazzo Ciano Ray Moseley Yale University Press x + 302pp.