count noun

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countable noun

Countable nouns (also known as count nouns) are nouns that can be considered as individual, separable items, which means that we are able to count them with numbers—we can have one, two, five, 15, 100, and so on. We can also use them with the indefinite articles a and an (which signify a single person or thing) or with the plural form of the noun.
Countable nouns contrast with uncountable nouns (also known as non-count or mass nouns), which cannot be separated and counted as individual units or elements. Uncountable nouns cannot take an indefinite article, nor can they be made plural.
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count noun

Linguistics Logic a noun that can be qualified by the indefinite article, and may be used in the plural, as telephone and thing but not airs and graces or bravery
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The English nouns studied in contrast with their Polish equivalents in the present text have been selected randomly from numerous nouns which are considered either collective mass nouns in subject literature, such as loaves of bread or tubs of butter, or collective count nouns, such as flocks of sheep.
Use the word number for the quantity of a count noun, a quantity considered as several discrete items.
In the following, referent nouns will be categorised as count nouns, mass nouns or abstracts in accordance with Wagner (2005).
b) Count nouns which denote all the members in their class:
In examples [q] and [r], plural count nouns which are used with a general meaning are preceded by the definite article as the rule applies in Spanish.
If the language distinguishes (in the singular) between count and non-count nouns such that one kind uses the indefinite article and the other kind does not use the indefinite article, then it is the count nouns that tend to use the indefinite article and it is the non-count nouns that tend not to use the indefinite article.
As explained earlier, the experiment also included a Neutral condition, in which the nonce words were presented without a referent in a grammatical context compatible with both mass and count nouns.
Singular count nouns may be quantified with words like one, each, or every.
So contrary to their claims, a classifier is not absolutely required to make count nouns countable in Mandarin Chinese.
Fewer is used with count nouns (see few above): "There were fewer diners in the restaurant on Monday than on Thursday.
Regular count nouns in English take an obligatory number inflection, with zero suffix for singular and -s for plural.
Singular count nouns are, as a rule, required to be marked by a determiner under both interpretations, and the semantic distinction appears to be obvious only in opaque contexts.