countertransference

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countertransference

[¦kau̇nt·ər·tranz′fər·əns]
(psychology)
The conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient, which may interfere with psychotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other theorists have also reconceptualized counter-transference. Donna Orange (1995) goes so far to suggest that perhaps the term counter-transference should be dropped all together, and we should rather refer to the therapist's emotional reaction to the patient as co-transference.
Arguably, the intertwined psychic sadomasochistic elements involved in transference and counter-transference reaches beyond the written text and highlights the vulnerabilities of the therapist.
Similarly, the feelings of the therapist toward the client are often described as counter-transference. While counter-transference feelings are at times used as clues for diagnosis or for fine-tuned understanding of clinical processes, they are a function of the analyst's psyche and would hinder progress in analysis when the clinician acts on them (Freud, 1958/1910; Kernberg, Selzer & Koenigsberg, 1989).
Deborah Steinberg, Sharon Dollarhide discussed the issues of counter-transference and Prescription drug abuse.
The German social historians, Aschheim points out, were trained by professors who supported Nazism, and who in reaction (and as a form of counter-transference) cultivated positivist orientations on one hand, but on the other did indeed raise critical questions in relation to social structure and the institutions that laid the groundwork for the rise of Nazism.
He devotes two full chapters to pharmacotherapy and its complications, including important transference and counter-transference issues, and describes family interventions and therapies, group therapy, individual therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapies, psychodynamic therapies, and future considerations.
Extrapolating from counter-transference in the psychoanalytic context to spectatorship in the context of media encounters, this paper mines both possibilities and resistances to empathic witnessing by asking how it is, exactly, that representations of self-harm get under the skin of onlookers with such force.
References to "psychopaths," "counter-transference," "reaction formation," "madness" and even "ADHD" pepper the book.
* Transference--counter-transference: the duality of the therapeutic relationship where a client has feelings about the therapist (transference) or a therapist has feelings about a client (counter-transference).