Counterweight


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counterweight

[′kau̇nt·ər‚wāt]
(mechanical engineering)
A device which counterbalances the original load in elevators and skip and mine hoists, going up when the load goes down, so that the engine must only drive against the unbalanced load and overcome friction.
Any weight placed on a mechanism which is out of balance so as to maintain static equilibrium. Also known as counterbalance; counterpoise.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Counterweight

A heavy component used to counterbalance the weight of a movable element; connected either with a cable over a pulley as in elevators or at one end of a lever as in a bascule bridge.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Counterweight

 

(also, counterbalance, counterpoise), a weight used for the complete or partial balancing of forces and moments in machines or their parts. The installation of counterweights on rotating parts, such as crankshafts, can eliminate the harmful effects of centrifugal forces originating from off-center masses.

In metalcutting machine tools, hoists, deep-well plunger pumps, and similar machines with vertically or obliquely moving parts, counterweights reduce the drive power. In hoisting cranes, counterweights provide stability; the arm and weight of the crane’s counterweight are selected to balance the moment of the weight of the mechanisms and metal frame together with half of the moment of a rated load. Counterweights are usually made in the form of a set of pig-iron or concrete bars or slabs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

counterweight

1. A weight that just balances another weight.
2. In a theater stagehouse, a weight (usually of iron, sand, or shot) used to balance suspended scenery, or the like.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The counterweight had given Kennedy and his helpers trouble.
Of course, as is the case with the whole telescope, refinements are possible for the counterweight system.
Cincinnati shows the heritage of the hemp rigging fly tower, initially adopted by Sosman and Landis Scenic Studios of Chicago for its early counterweight rigging systems.
In order to maintain the contribution of each counterweight to eliminate vibrations, the balance factor is broken into two distinct parts:
where W is the mass of counterweight including mass of pulleys, [m.sub.R2] is the actual mass of suspension ropes on counterweight side.
WHILE HEMP HOUSES HAVE DEEP stages, they cannot hang as many set pieces as theatres with modern counterweight systems because, since the bulky sandbags require a lot more space, those theatres have fewer "line sets" from which to hang.
20 and 21 showed the modes of concrete beams under the working condition with the counterweight of 30 kN and 60 kN.
Gearless systems with counterweight and cable drum systems are more efficient than basic gearless systems, while hydraulic units, are the least efficient.
In each yo-yo contest there are five categories - single hand, double hand with one yo-yo, double with two yo-yos, offstring and counterweight. Matt takes part in the single hand and counterweight disciplines.
Offered in multiple capacities, the lifters come in three different styles: lightweight, wheeled lightweight and standard with counterweight. For unique applications, custom lifters can be engineered and manufactured.
Dubai: The crane accident last week that killed three workers and injured four was caused by the crane's metal counterweight, which weighed 2.5 tonnes, crashing down, according to a preliminary report.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- A senior member of the Iranian parliament on Saturday underlined the necessity to activate the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) as a counterweight to superpowers and their aggressive policies against independent states.