counting house

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counting house

A building once used primarily for accounting and bookkeeping.
References in classic literature ?
This advantage she improved by hobbling up the steps with such despatch that before Mr Fledgeby could take measures for her finding nobody at home, she was face to face with him in the counting-house.
Miss Wren with a fallen countenance sat behind the door looking thoughtfully at the ground, and the long and patient silence had again set in for some time, when the expression of Mr Fledgeby's face betokened that through the upper portion of the door, which was of glass, he saw some one faltering on the brink of the counting-house. Presently there was a rustle and a tap, and then some more rustling and another tap.
It was a dirty little box, this counting-house, with nothing in it but an old ricketty desk and two stools, a hat-peg, an ancient almanack, an inkstand with no ink, and the stump of one pen, and an eight-day clock which hadn't gone for eighteen years at least, and of which the minute-hand had been twisted off for a tooth-pick.
By this time he had placed chairs for them in the counting-house. As Flora dropped into hers, she bestowed the old look upon him.
Then, looking towards the glass front of the counting-house, and seeing two figures approaching, she cried with infinite relish, 'Papa!
On the Monday morning at a quarter before nine, Herbert went to the counting-house to report himself - to look about him, too, I suppose - and I bore him company.
Ere long he turned away abruptly, as if baffled, and left the counting-house; he returned to it but twice in the course of that day; each time he mixed and swallowed a glass of brandy-and-water, the materials for making which he extracted from a cupboard on one side of the fireplace; having glanced at my translations--he could read both French and German--he went out again in silence.
The counting-house clock was at half past twelve, and there was general preparation for going to dinner, when Mr.
So he put on his hat, and went out with his cane under his arm: very upright, and humming a tune when he was clear of the counting-house.
The door of Scrooge's counting-house was open that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters.
My spirit never walked beyond our counting-house -- mark me!
'Tim,' said brother Charles, 'you understand that we have an intention of taking this young gentleman into the counting-house?'