Mother Courage

(redirected from Courasche)

Mother Courage

shrewd old woman who makes her living by following the armies of the Thirty Years’ War selling her wares to the soldiers. [Ger. Drama: Brecht Mother Courage and Her Children in Benét, 690]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Illustree dans le meme espace culturel par Alonso Jeronimo de Salas Barbadillo, (La hija de la Celestina, 1612 et La ingeniosa Elena, 1614), vers la fin du XVIIe elle acquiert une dimension europeenne par sa version allemande de Hans Jakob Christoffel Grimmelshausen, ayant comme protagoniste la friponne Courasche (Lebensbeschreibung der Ertzbetragerin und Landstortzerin Courasche, 1670).
(5) Although his Abenteuerliche Simplicissimus (1669) is the most conspicuously picaresque of his works, Die Landst6rtzerin Courasche (1670) achieved a higher literary status.
Waltraud Maierhofer's book investigates images of women in narrative and visual texts about the Thirty Years War from Grimmelshausen's Courasche (1670) to Walter Umminger's Winterkonigreich (1994).
Der Dreissigjahrige Krieg im Musiktheater wahrend der NS-Zeit: Untersuchungen zu politischen Aspekten der Musik am Beispiel von Karl Amadeus Hartmanns Des Simplicius Simplicissimus Jugend, Ludwig Mauricks Simplicius Simplicissimus, Richard Mohaupts Die Gaunerstreiche der Courasche, Eberhard Wolfgang Mollers und Hans Joachim Sobanskis Das Frankenburger Wurfelspiel und Joseph Gregors und Richard Strauss' Friedenstag.
Continuatio [1669], Ertzbetrugerin Courasche [1670], Der seltzame Springinsfeld [1670], Des wunderbarliche Vogelnest [1672-1675]) pick up characters and themes of Simplicissimus.
Continuations of the novel include Die Landstortzerin Courasche (1670; Courage, the Adventuress), which was the inspiration for Bertolt Brecht's play Mutter Courage und ihre Kinder (1941; Mother Courage and Her Children), and Das wunderbarliche Vogel-Nest (1672; "The Magical Bird's Nest").
In a chapter on portrayals of women that draw on the medieval and early modern idea of Frau Welt, Dye shows us how the will to anchor fear of sex and fear of death in woman apparently never goes out of fashion, from Grimmelshausen's Courasche via Goethe's Adelheid and Wedekind's Lulu to Marlene Dietrich.
They also offer a welcome balance between Grimmelshausen's better-known works, particularly Der Abentheuerliche Simplicissimus Teutsch (1668) and Lebensbeschreibung der Ertzbetrugerin and Landstortzerin Courasche (1670), and less-studied aspects of his oeuvre, such as illustrations, his non-Simplician narratives, and his Ewig-wahrender Calender (1671).
In an example of the fruitful differences of opinion between contributors, Schweitzer argues in detail for Courasche's location within the picaresque, looking at the Spanish tradition and drawing comparisons with Francisco Lopez de Ubeda's La Picara Justina (1605), with which Grimmelshausen was familiar, while, by contrast, Italo Michele Battafarano argues that Courasche is a departure from the picaresque, because of the protagonist's lack of remorse.
Menhennet's argument provides a key to the paradoxical Courasche in that it deals directly with the problematic relationship between the central character's role as a warning, negative example and her engaging vitality.
Barbara Becker-Cantarino's comparison of Dr Faustus and Grimmelshausen's Courasche is a model summary of how gender constructions impinge on literature.