courtesan

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courtesan

, courtezan
(esp formerly) a prostitute, or the mistress of a man of rank
References in periodicals archive ?
23 One attempt to distinguish between noblewomen and courtesans included restricting the latter from wearing pearls in public (Vecellio, 1590, 138).
Aging courtesans married or often trained a successor, sometimes their own daughters, in whose households they continued to live.
The role of women wise in the ways of human nature and women wise in the ways of the world has often been examined under the rubrics of witches and courtesans.
Shady Ladies Tours presents a four-day tour of Parisian art, architecture, and culture, with the backdrop of famous seductresses Like royal mistresses Madame de Pompadour and Madame du Barry, and courtesans like the Lady of the Camellias.
The Sisterhood trains young women to spend their lives as the wives or courtesans of wealthy men known as the Benefactors, but Kalinda and Jaya would much rather remain together in their Temple home in the mountains than be chosen by a Benefactor and separated forever.
Social amphibology' is the key term that unites the three short chapters, respectively entitled 'Words,' 'Letters,' and 'Images,' of The Renaissance Courtesan, in which Eugenio Giusti analyzes the ways in which courtesans and prostitutes between the 16th and 18th centuries, both in their own social and literary modes of self-representation as well as in the views espoused by their contemporaries and in contemporary critical approaches, often managed to evade the traditional social boundaries by which they were ostensibly defined and confined.
Noel writes into history women who were colony administrators, hospital founders, successful entrepreneurs and influential aristocrats, as well as women who were illicit trade operators, tavern keepers and courtesans.
Courtesans were often a favorite theme along with scenes from the licensed quarter.
Therefore, let us put aside the "expert advice and opinion" of the courtesans and return to the European rule of law, suggests Tanja Karakamisheva-Jovanovska in Dnevnik.
Courtesans, Concubines, and the Cult of Female Fidelity.
Diachronic means "happening over time" and the author's intent is to trace how over the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteen centuries women in general and prostitutes and courtesans in particular crossed class boundaries and challenged social rules.