Coxiella

(redirected from Coxiella burnetii)
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Coxiella

[‚käk·sē′el·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of the tribe Rickettsieae; short rods which grow preferentially in host cell vacuoles.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Next, they extended their observations to demonstrate that FIASMA treatment killed the Q fever agent, Coxiella burnetii, and partially inhibited chlamydial infections in cell culture.
Ticks are spread life-threatening infectious diseases such as typhus (Rickettsia conorii), Q fever (Coxiella burnetii), tularemia (Francisella tularensis), Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), and CCHF (Nairovirus).
Coxiellosis, a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, acts as a major trade barricade and adversely affects the productive and reproductive capabilities of animals.
Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii and is found worldwide.
A bacteria Coxiella burnetii e o agente etiologico da doenca conhecida como Febre Q, uma zoonose de distribuicao mundial.
rickettsii, are probable or confirmed vectors of Leishmania, Coxiella burnetii, and R.
A recurrent benign form of 6th nerve palsy, a rarer still palsy, has been described in the literature, and it is of presumed inflammatory etiology, associated with live attenuated vaccines, or following viral and bacterial infections such as Varicella zoster, Epstein-Barr virus, Cytomegalovirus, or Coxiella burnetii [5, 6].
Phylogenetic analysis shows that avian coxiellosis agents and Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, represent 2 independent events of development of vertebrate pathogenicity in this group of tick endosymbionts.
Harmsen, "Resident alveolar macrophages are susceptible to and permissive of Coxiella burnetii infection," PLoS One, vol.
Q fever is a zoonotic infection caused by the obligate intracellular gram-negative pathogen Coxiella burnetii. Acute or persistent localized infection can occur, often with variable clinical and pathological features [1].