Coypel


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Coypel

(kwäpĕl`), family of French painters. Noël Coypel, 1628–1707, director of the Académie de France à Rome and later of the Académie royale de péinture et de sculpture in Paris, was employed on the decorations of the palaces of the Louvre, Tuileries, Fontainebleau, and Versailles. One of his best-known paintings is the Martyrdom of St. James (Notre-Dame de Paris). He was succeeded as director of the Académie royale by his son, Antoine Coypel, 1661–1722, who was made court painter in 1716. His Aeneid series, painted for the Palais-Royal, are among the foremost expressions of high baroque decoration in France. His work combined the pedantry of classical taste with the melodrama of baroque trompe-l'œil (illusionistic) effects. He was also an accomplished etcher.
References in periodicals archive ?
I read Don Quixote in French, my native language, as probably did Charles Coypel (1694-1752), first painter to Louis XV, who became the most influential 18th-century illustrator of Cervantes' novel.
A keen entrepreneur, Coypel entrusted the engraving of his Don Quixote paintings to some of the most distinguished French 18th-century printmakers.
late seventeenth century by Noel Coypel for the Gobelins workshop, and
Parisian painter Noel-Nicolas Coypel received many commissions from wealthy aristocrats.
In keeping with the conventions of such French painters as Noel-Nicolas Coypel, his men are tawny and his women, as his three goddesses are here, twists of silver.
Crozat purchased the contents of two volumes; those in the other went to the painter Charles-Antoine Coypel (1694-1752).
Even as a painter he learnt the rudiments of his art, after an inadequate apprenticeship, as a jobbing assistant to such ceiling-decorators as Carle Vanloo and No[ddot{e}] Nicolas Coypel.
Philippe Coypel and his Wife by Charles-Antoine Coypel (1694-1752), 1742.
Charles-Antoine Coypel served as First Painter to the King and as professor at and eventually director of the French Academy.
The structure adopted by Allen is simple but effective: studying the artistic careers of Le Brun and his pupils (although Houasse, Verdier, Licherie and Michel Corneille the Younger are missing) and then introducing Pierre Mignard and demonstrating the rise of rubenisme, which would triumph at the beginning of the eighteenth century with La Fosse and Antoine Coypel.
This brolly printed with the classic Angels in Clouds by Coypels is pounds 19.
Hogarth was also much influenced by De Troy, whose character, complicated by a touch of madness, was as difficult as Hogarth's, and Lebas, as well as by more conventional academicians, such as the Coypels, father and son.