Craft Union


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Craft Union

 

a trade union whose members have a specialized skill or are qualified for a given type of work. The first craft unions arose in the late 18th century in Great Britain, Western Europe, and the United States. With the growing division of labor and the simultaneous rise of large-scale capitalist enterprises, the craft unions were superseded by the industrial unions, which united all the workers of a single enterprise, whatever their occupation, and were thus more relevant to the needs of the workers’ class struggle. The industrial unions’ influence among workers has grown considerably in the 20th century; nevertheless, craft unions have survived in a number of capitalist countries—such as Great Britain and the USA—and are even the predominant type of union in certain branches of the economy.

References in periodicals archive ?
The craft unions in the railroad industry are like a jigsaw puzzle.
All four unions in this study scored above a 7.0 on the 10 point scale developed by Agarwal and Venkatesh (2002) ranging from 7.0 for the craft union to a 7.9 for the service union.
In the end, the strike was broken by workers brought in by rail from other furniture-making centers, the poverty induced by the length of the strike, the 2,000 striking workers not allowed to join the exclusive craft unions and receive strike benefits, and the official condemnation of the Christian Reformed Church, the Protestant religion of the Dutch strikers.
Because the craft unions had few or no black members, Federal contractors rarely hired blacks for skilled positions.
Led by a conservative craft union representing the elite skilled workers in the mill, the whole town organized itself like an army to seize the mill and defeat a detachment of Pinkertons.
"Craft Union is still in its infancy but the extensive schemes I've seen at the ones we've done so far are impressive.
Nonetheless, such craft union militancy was also frequently accompanied by active resistance to organizing and admitting into union membership unskilled workers, who often worked alongside their skilled counterparts (for example, southern and eastern European immigrants working in the iron and Steel industries in the late 19th and early 20th centuries), as well as women workers (in early 20th century tailoring and garment manufacturing), and workers of colour (especially African Americans, but also Asian and Latino workers, in many industries and at various times).
The range of possibilities is very variable, ranging from craft union activities to educational orders.
CPAC, the Canadian Pipeline Advisory Council, is a co-operative joint labor/management group comprised of senior pipeline craft union representatives and PLCAC officers who collectively meet with owner clients and share industry exclusive ideas between owners, contractors and the four trade unions.
Contrary to the myths of voluntarism that often characterize craft union histories, these organized workers immediately took up the political cudgel, lobbying the state legislature and pressuring the city to improve enforcement of the plumbing code.
* Increased partnership between the Canadian Pipeline Advisory Council (CPAC), a co-operative joint labor/management group comprised of senior pipeline craft union representatives and PLCAC officers, and the owner clients by participating in meetings that resulted in an industry exclusive sharing of ideas between owners, contractors and the four trade unions.
These craft union members blamed the Labour Department's provocation, having "callously turned a deaf ear to their earlier demands for improved conditions over a long time." (78) During the next two days, 310 other workers and about sixty welders struck in sympathy.